Take the 2-minute tour ×
Anime & Manga Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for anime and manga fans. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm referring to those red "symbols" which are, as I've found out, called Magatamas. I'm interested in knowing the fact that, do they representing something important or are they just some kind of ornaments?

SOSP with Magatamas

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Magatamas as you most likely found out as well are ceremonial and religious objects and are well used objects in the Japanese Mythology.

I have no ways to proof this is so but is one of the best guesses we have ( just like with allot of Naruto related stuff)

As described in the part under here. The Magatamas have a direct connection with Susanoo and Amaterasu. The sage of the six paths was also worshiped as the Saviour of this World (この世の救世主, Kono Yo no Kyūseishu).

The Kojiki and Nihon shoki, completed in the 8th century, have numerous references to magatama. They appear in the early in the first chapter of the Nihon shoki, which largely describes the mythology of Japan. Susanoo, god of the sea and storms, received five hundred magatama from Tamanoya no mikoto, or Ame-no-Autodidact-no-mikoto, the jewel-making deity. Susanoo went to heaven and presented them to his sister, the sun goddess Amaterasu, who bit off successive parts of the magatama, and blew them away to create other deities. Tamanoya no mikoto remains the kami god of magatama, glasses, and cameras. In the legend Amaterasu later shuts herself in a cave. AMA-no-Koyane-no-mikoto hung magatama, among other objects, on a five hundred-branch sakaki tree, to successfully lure Amaterasu from the cave. In the year 58, in the reign of the Emperor Suinin, the Nihon shoki records that a dog kills and disembowels a mujina, a type of badger, and a magatama was discovered in its stomach. This magatama was presented to Suinin, who enshrined it at Isonokami Shrine, where it is said to presently reside. A similar practice is described again in the Nihon shoki during the reign of the Emperor Chūai. Chūai made an inspection trip to the Tsukushi, or Kyūshū, and was presented with an enormous sakaki tree hung with magatama as well as other sacred objects. Source

With this information we can say that the Magatama are either

  • Just some jewelery
  • Usage as a religious object aka worshiping
  • or used as Reference to Japanese Mythology. Susanoo/Amaterasu.

But unless we get to know more about Hagoromo Otsutsuki we will never really know a definitive answer to this question

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.