The song that both Sala and Ange mysteriously know is called "Towagatari", which means something like "Eternal Story". The version that Ange sings is subtitled "Hikari no Uta" = "Song of Light"; the version that Sala sings is subtitled "Kaze no Uta" = "Song of Wind".

The duet version that they sing in the final episode is 1.) glorious; and 2.) subtitled "El Ragna".

Who or what is "El Ragna"? The Cross Ange wikia claims that it means "The Goddess", but I'm not sure on what basis they make that claim ("El Ragna" doesn't mean anything in Japanese, at least). I don't recall the show telling us what "El Ragna" means; is there perhaps some side material that does tell us what's up?

  • While some indicate "ragna" (as in ragnarok), is genitive of regin (n. pl., "the gods/great powers") in Old Norse. However, on p.258 of this article, it's indicate that it's also a verb, ragna, meaning "to use/practice witchcraft/sorcery (upon)." It's also noted on p.260 that the ragna is not indicative of "the gods" per say, but rather of a great (intensive force.) – кяαzєя Jul 3 '15 at 3:58
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    Seeing as the "el" singular definite article does not exist in the Norse language, it could just be a Japanese hodgepodge of western stuff. – кяαzєя Jul 3 '15 at 4:00

Well, if you think about the lyrics, God(dess) would make sense.

The God(dess) that flies on the wind, making promises with destiny
The God(dess) that goes on the wind, with roaring wings

Also the wiki says the Ragna-mails are described as a mechanized angel. From that perspective, the angels draw their power from the God(dess), as the Convergence Space-time Cannons can only be activated when the song is sung.

Here they refer to it as "the god".

If I had to guess, I'd say that information came from the CD.


On another note, Crunchyroll or whoever really needs to hire better translators. If it was "the wind flies" then it would "kazega yuku" not "kazeni yuku".

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