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After watching a lot of "Ryuusei no Rockman", I've come to know the word "denpa" as meaning "wave", or "EM wave". Though I have heard it used in Katekyo Hitman Reborn as well. Is the rough translation of "wave" accurate?

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    If you don't find s tag you need, you can use the retag tag. Some one with the appropriate will tag your question accordingly. Additionally please limit your question to ask topic per question. Your JoJo question is unrelated, so please ask it separately. – кяαzєя Dec 5 '15 at 20:29
  • While these questions require similar expertise, I believe you should only ask one question per post. That way someone who can answer only one part can still reply. – Michael McQuade Dec 5 '15 at 20:40
  • Should probably be a separate question, but it's "toki yo tomare", which is a vocative construction meaning "Time, halt!". I don't know how it's typically subtitled/scanlated. – senshin Dec 5 '15 at 20:40
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Japanese is a highly contextual language. Often times common words have uncommon alternate meanings. It's best if you cite examples for your Reborn context.

In the case of Megaman StarForce, it is what it literally means. 電波 literally means "electromagnetic/radio waves." The former character 電 means electricity. The latter character 波, means wave, as in billows upon some medium.

電波 has some slang usage as well; by itself it can be used to describe nonsense or something pointless, in other words, noise.

電波系 (denpa-kei) can be used to describe someone crazy, typically one with irregular or wild fantasies or delusions, such as hearing voices. This may have some bearing on your Reborn question, but without sufficient context, it's hard to tell.

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電波 (denpa) does literally mean "electromagnetic wave; radio wave". Much like in any other language however, there are sometimes alternate meanings and slang. Denpa can also mean "nonsense" or event "individuals who are disconnected or disassociated from the people around them". It is even used to refer to a type of music.

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