6

Sometimes I have difficulty understanding Holo and Lawrence's wit, such as in this conversation on pages 48-49 of volume 9 of the light novels:

Holo: Aye, we're all greedy, always running about in service of our own gain.

Lawrence: On that count, I'm forced to agree. Of course...Of course, if I weren't so greedy, I'd be able to buy you tastier food.

Holo: Mm. But is seeing my pleasure not in your interests as well?

Lawrence: If you were truly so easily bribed by food, then that might be so.

Holo: And what other methods could you use?

Lawrence: If food is out, then with words or manners.

Holo: Neither of which is so reliable in your case.

Lawrence: (Quoting Eve) Or you could imagine you've been deceived and decide to trust both. They might well turn out to be genuine.

Holo: That isn't what I meant to say.

They were originally talking about Holo's attempt to get a narwahl, but then it branched off into this conversation.

With line 8, Lawrence feels that he has effectively put Holo in a corner. The text also mentions that line 8 is something Eve previously said. The text then states that Holo has no counterattack. However, when Holo makes her reply with line 9, Lawrence feels like she has done something unfair. I am uncertain as to why Lawrence feels as though he has won, and as to why he feels that Holo was unfair with line 9.

  • 1
    ...I think we'd probably need Holo's last reply to help here. – Clockwork-Muse Dec 18 '15 at 4:34
  • I'm sorry if my wording was difficult to understand, but that is the ending to the conversation. After that, Lawrence goes on to ask Holo to treat the loser nicely for a change. I'll try to edit it to be clearer. – Shaymin Gratitude Dec 18 '15 at 4:48
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    My interpretation is that Lawrence sees Holo's last line as something of an apology for implying that his words and manners aren't genuine. Lawrence sees this as unfair since she won the duel of wits by apologizing, putting him in a position where he couldn't, in fairness, press any verbal attack, because his opponent would not be fighting back. Recognizing that she's won the argument by removing his ability to fight, Lawrence asks her to treat him, the loser, nicely for a change. – Torisuda Dec 19 '15 at 4:01
  • Okay. That makes sense. – Shaymin Gratitude Dec 22 '15 at 1:44

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