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In the movie Ponyo, the backgrounds (the clouds, pictured below) are not done in a typical anime style. Instead, they are much more lifelike and 3D.

enter image description here

What is the technique used to do this? Is this used in other films or series?

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  • Hmm, I'd say borderline off-topic in favour of graphic design Commented Mar 20, 2013 at 10:54
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    @MadaraUchiha I'd agree it's a bit close to the edge, but I didn't worry about that too much as it's specific to this movie (and, more generally, Miyazaki productions). It's also not "How do I do this?" but rather "What did this anime artist used to achieve said effect?" I'd be open to a meta or chat discussion about it, though.
    – Cattua
    Commented Mar 20, 2013 at 16:02
  • Well, since we haven't had any close votes, I'd say people agree with you. Carry on :) Commented Mar 20, 2013 at 17:56
  • You might found this interesting, it's a real-time demonstration of the man who painted "Totoro" backgrounds. youtube.com/watch?v=a1bCIkKQm0U
    – leonbloy
    Commented Mar 20, 2014 at 21:17

1 Answer 1

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Those are good old hand-drawn backgrounds. Here's a part of an interview with Suzuki Toshio, executive producer and former president of Studio Ghibli (emphasis mine):

During this decade CG [computer graphics, - singerofthefall] came up and we realized that it enables us to make expressions richer when using it as supplement of regular cel [sic!] animation. On the other hand a new problem appeared. The progress of computing tech is so fast that it isn't easy to catch up. If a movie at one point is made by the highest tech, it will become outdated soon. There is one more point. We tried CG on Howl’s. For example, the legs of the castle were made by CG. However, it didn't seem very natural to me and I told Miyazaki that his skill was better than that of a computer. He accepted it and quit using CG after that. Hence the latter half of Howl’s doesn't include any CG. We now know CG has both its plus and minus sides. So the theme of this movie is as the story: simple. The visual effects are simple as well, while on the other hand it needs very hard working because of the drawing all it by hand.

It is also mentioned here:

Miyazaki, whose films include "Princess Mononoke," "Howl's Moving Castle" and "My Neighbor Totoro," has used computer animation to embellish hand-drawn images. But before "Ponyo" went into production, he shut down the computer-graphics department at his Studio Ghibli, opting to work solely in hand-drawn images.

And finally, from this article:

He insisted he still uses a pencil to draw his animated characters and backgrounds: “Currently computer graphics are used a great deal,” he noted, “but it can be excessive. I think [animation] needs the pencil, needs man’s hands drawing.”

I would recommend you to check some of Makoto Shinkai's works (if you haven't seen them before) the quality of the animation and backgrounds there is stunning.

Update: There is an artbook called "The Art of Ponyo", which contains sketches hand-drawn by Miyazaki. I don't own it, but you can take a look at it's reviews here, here and here. The book includes both pencil and watercolor drawings, including characters, backgrounds, etc:

Usually I use poster paint to create the backgrounds; then I color the base in a pale color, adding subtle hues and shading on top of it. This time, with Ponyo, I added things like tints or detailed expressions with colored pencil on top of what I drew with poster paint...

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  • This seems to cover most of the basics, but doesn't touch on what the technique is beyond the hand sketches. Is it pencil crayons, crayons, or maybe a specific type of painting (watercolor, acrylic)?
    – Cattua
    Commented Mar 20, 2013 at 16:04
  • @Eric, I've updated the answer, hope it helps. There isn't much information about the production of the movie in the Internet (at least in English, maybe there is some in Japanese, but I don't know Japanese), so that's about all I was able to find. Commented Mar 21, 2013 at 5:26
  • Good advice! I found a quote from the book which you may want to add to your answer: "Usually I use poster paint to create the backgrounds; then I color the base in a pale color, adding subtle hues and shading on top of it. This time, with Ponyo, I added things like tints or detailed expressions with colored pencil on top of what I drew with poster paint..."
    – Cattua
    Commented Mar 21, 2013 at 13:37
  • @Eric, nice quote, thanks :P added it to the answer. Commented Mar 21, 2013 at 13:40
  • The bit about inclusion/exclusion CG is more relevant about moving objects, the OP asks about backgrounds.
    – leonbloy
    Commented Mar 20, 2014 at 21:15

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