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Suzuha inevitably dies in 2000 after traveling back to 1975 to obtain the IBN.

It doesn't create any paradoxes, so there is no reason why she can't live to 2010 as long as Suzuha doesn't interact with her other self and the lab members until "August 9th, 2010" (the date she departs for 1975). Okabe has already demonstrated that you can co-exist with your other self.

Is her death just another convergence of the worldlines? If so, why? What significance does Suzu's death have on the worldline that the "universe" demands that she die at that point in time?

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From the wikia:

However, she dies cause of an illness due to her time travelling in 2000 at the age of 43.

It just seems like the time traveling had a physical toll on her body which caused her death.

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Yes, you have answered the question yourself. It is just a convergence of the Attractor Field Theory in Steins;Gate. That is predetermined in the alpha world line, much like how Mayuri is also predetermined to die within a certain range of dates in August 2010.

There is no significance whatsoever. You might even ask why is Mayuri predetermined to die. The reason is simply the convergence point, or 'fate' if you want to be unscientific.

It is impossible to escape World Line Convergence without entering another Attractor Field by changing history, which can only be accomplished through time travel. This is also why you don't see Suzuha dying in 2000 in the beta/gate world line.

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It's kind of convergence- her dying is a direct result of SERN dystopia which is the Alpha convergence. In one of the light novels it was revealed that Suzuha's sickness was actually HER INNER ORGANS SLOWLY TURNING INTO GEL. Daru in the future couldn't make a complete time machine because of the SERN monopoly.

So as long as they are in Alpha attractor field, SERN is a convergence point, which means that Daru can't make a complete time machine, which means that Suzuha dies from gel organs.

  • Please include relevant sources/references. – W. Are May 6 at 14:27

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