17

In the sixth episode of the second season of Darker than Black, Hei hung up a payphone.

Payphone image

On this payphone there is some symbol. They’re supposedly in Russia; however, the Russian currency symbol is ₽. What does this symbol mean? I doubt they would make up a currency since they also reference the CIA and MI6.

1
  • Have you actually seen that symbol get used in Russia? In my recollection, I only remember руб being used …
    – Jan
    Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

27
+100

Not only is that the symbol for Japanese yen, the phone itself is also something utterly Japanese, a pink public phone:

enter image description here

They're very iconic (somewhat ubiquitous decades ago when you'd see them in shops or restaurants) but also very outdated (They only take 10 yen coins which is not much at all). If there are any still being operated then as something between a curiosity and a "living fossil".

So basically, if that scene is supposed to play in Russia, it's either some sort of joke or the animators were very sloppy, maybe reusing a generic "using a public phone" sequence.

14

That's just the Japanese word "yen", written as a word 円 en rather than with the currency symbol ¥.

1
  • 1
    So we can just chuck it up to the animators preference rather than some in universe reason why Yen is being used in Russia?
    – Memor-X
    Commented Jan 4, 2017 at 23:00
8

That's the kanji 円, pronounced "hen" or "yen", which means both "circle" and, as you might have guessed from the pronunciation, the japanese currency.

The ¥ symbol is the international symbol of the currency used for trade deals and in tourist destinations inside Japan, while 円 is the more common and japanese way to refer to local money.

3
  • 1
    So we can just chuck it up to the animators preference rather than some in universe reason why Yen is being used in Russia?
    – Memor-X
    Commented Jan 4, 2017 at 23:00
  • 3
    Pretty much. This could be a mistake, it could've been done on purpose, or it could just be a case of whoever was assigned to that specific series of frames not caring enough.
    – Some Guy
    Commented Jan 4, 2017 at 23:07
  • 3
    The pronunciation you're referring to is neither "hen" nor "yen", but "en", like in "and" but without the terminal "d". Any other pronunciation is totally different.
    – Right leg
    Commented Jan 6, 2017 at 9:28

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .