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In anime, i always seen some item rarity that classified like

  • S (super)
  • SS (super super (?) ) maybe... i dont know

and many alphabetic words. Why did they add like "S" for super on the classified of rarity item like that ? Why they dont use like "A+","A-","B+" just like score result of an exam ? What is the story behind it ? What's the first anime/literature that used this kind of method ?

Ex. Classified Greed island Card Rarity in Hunter x Hunter

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    R, SR, and SSR/UR (their exact definition can vary between games) are specific to gatcha games in general and have no bearing on anime and manga in particular. HxH's Greed Island arc uses SS-H for card rarity limits. Related: gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/70673/… Theses are two similar but unrelated concepts. – кяαzєя Aug 25 '17 at 16:54
  • thnaks for the explanation @кяαzєя – Gagantous Aug 25 '17 at 17:24
  • This isn't specific to item rarity; in One-Punch Man the hero rankings go from A to S as well, and outside anime you have chocobo rankings in Final Fantasy VII doing the same. – Torisuda Aug 27 '17 at 1:37
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    They do use +/- in some settings, such as Lyrical Nanoha's mage ranks (they still have S, SS, and SSS ranks there, and the +/- apply to them as well), or for stats, skills and Noble Phantasm ranks on the Fate series (they don't have S rank, but instead it's called EX rank when it's beyond measurement). In the end, it's just the author choice how to rank items, skills, etc. They could rank them Normal, Magic, Rare, Epic, Legendary like some games do and it wouldn't matter if it's what the author wants. – paulnamida Aug 29 '17 at 0:23
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It not generally used in reallife. It is originally come from Japanese Animation & Games, is generally come from games. In real life school ranking mark only A, B, C is credit marks, this will feel not enough for high ranking. In Games, is freely to input A+, A-, B+, B- rank system, but games generally put on SSS, SS, S, A, B, C, D, E, F, make players feel more happy on their result.

It means Super or Superior or alike surprise. Superlative classification. Super x3, Super x2, is weird to put Sx2, Sx3, so it is SSS, SS.

Some of games you can see R, SR, SSR, UR. R is meaning "Rare", mostly in card games. That means you get a rare card. SR is Super Rare. SSR is Specially Super Rare sometimes. UR is Ultimate Rare.

Rare[R]Super Rare[SR] Card Sample , Ultimate Rare[UR] Card sample

Edit

I remember I learned about this game s-ranking system, but I don't remember who is the author of making this system, sorry. I remember have origin author who make this s-rank, but not remember the name, this is minor title in history. Such as statement "The atom bomb S-Ranked Hiroshima" from Urban Dictionary: S-Rank. And, SS-Rank is by The early rank system of 1926, insignia of the Schutzstaffel. Early military.

Information is here: Giant Bomb: S-Rank, S-Rank_Japanese

  • any reference ? for make your answer more acceptable. reference,journal,literature,etc. – Gagantous Sep 3 '17 at 7:17
  • I studied this at college, university. – Red Aura Sep 3 '17 at 8:06
  • eh ? what kind of subject did you studied ? i have upvoted your answer, but maybe i will wait for another answer. – Gagantous Sep 3 '17 at 8:09
  • I studied this at college, university. I studied art, design, animation and games. I come to this website is for look on questions and answered. Gagantous, you're just fans. You don't how long and low many an artist have studied. – Red Aura Sep 3 '17 at 8:40
  • i would have to disagree with the part about it being hard to script A+/A- in games, infarct it's very easy since in real life the F-A rating is (from my experience) represented from a percentage value as such any rating system can be scripted if you have a numerical amount to base it in, for instance The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky SC uses G-A ranking with + in between them (ie. G, G+, F, F+, E, etc) for your Bracer Rank which is calculated by your BP Total – Memor-X Sep 3 '17 at 8:53

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