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What's the meaning of the crayon painting picture just after Shinji choke Asuka ? The picture below is some of the crayon-painting in The End Of Evangelion:

Unknown Guy Unknown Guy

A boy inside a house? unknown kid inside a room ?

Wth is that ? wth is this

Boy and woman ?  Boy and woman ?

A bucket of fish Summer vacation, i guess ?

Dog Corpse Dog Corpse

A Murder Case Murder Case

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    the last time i recall this was in the original series and the reason i read was that the studio ran out of money. but i don't think it's the case here – Memor-X Sep 18 '17 at 12:40
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I think the general consensus is that it's up to your own interpretation. They are a mix of actual children's drawings and some that were made to look like children's drawings but were actually created by the staff (e.g. the gutted dog and the bucket of fish).

There is commentary that's part of the "Eva Tomo no Kai" (Eva Fan Club) newsletters that supposedly mention that these drawings were created by children who went through abuse/traumatic experiences and were drawn as part of some sort of therapy. I can't provide the actual source or the scan, though, so take that tidbit with a grain of salt.

So it's possible that the sequence alludes to that of a child (or children, as in the Evangelion pilots) who went through traumatic experiences (piloting, fighting, general psychological struggles from the events of the series) and attempting to cope with them. Sort of like the idea behind the therapy children's drawings.

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As an art therapist and psychologist-in-training, I can tell you, that yes, the pictures that were actually drawn by children (the "real" pictures) could likely be a part of art therapy and reveal psychologically-damaging/traumatizing people or events. However, these drawings would usually be kept confidential when drawn within therapy sessions, so it is irregular that they would just be picked up by Anno and added into the movie out of the blue. . .

  • Agreed. It's more likely that Eva's staff looked for children's drawings that were similar to or looked like they could have been used in art therapy, but the story changed in the telling. – Brent P. Newhall Aug 17 '18 at 20:28

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