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When Garou fights heroes does he actually kill them or just severly injure them. If he killed them then that will leave the Hero Association at a huge loss and in previous episodes

When Garou fought the 8 heroes in Gatling Gunner's squad it seemed like some of them died.

Does he actually kill heroes?

marked as duplicate by Dimitri mx Jul 1 at 11:12

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No, he severely injures many of them, enough to require hospitalization, but there are no actual hero kills associated to Garou. His initial appearance is probably his most murderous looking, though: he clearly severs Blue Flame's arm clean off (which can very easily be lethal), for example. He even talks a lot about how he's going to kill everyone there, hero or not. Possibly Garou was originally intended to be legitimately murderous, but these behaviors are still consistent with the fear he wishes to instill everyone with.

The Monster Association calls him out on how he claims to be a monster but yet doesn't kill any heroes. That's why they demand he actually go kill a hero to properly join them. Garou, however, doesn't much care for their demands. He sees it as, at best, stereotypical and lame monster/hero dynamics, one of the things he's looking to upend and subvert; and at worst that wanton murdering (especially for social conformity) is not even consistent with what monsters should be doing.

Much later in the webcomic

Saitama also calls him out on not having killed anyone, saying he must have intentionally fought everyone in a way that they could survive. Earlier he calls Garou a big softy. Later he posits that Garou just wanted to be a hero, but found it difficult and gave up and took the easy way out of being a monster; he just couldn't shed his desire to not kill people. Saitama thinks Garou intentionally didn't kill anyone
You can see here in the last panel that the S-class heroes are demanding his death. This is meant to contrast the faults of the so-called heroes versus the ideals of Garou and Saitama. That was much of the point of this story arc, in fact: to subvert the Hero genre and point out its flaws and failures, both at individual and societal levels. Saitama just sees Garou as a human who beat some people up, so won't kill him, while the "heroes" are all murderously incensed.

  • Hi, can you tell me from where can I read the webcomic? (including that chapter you posted). – Zacky Jun 30 at 21:14
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    @Zacky I can't provide a link to a translated version, as that would run afoul of site policies. The original japanese webcomic can be found here (chapter links at the bottom). A google search should allow you to search for translations. The chapters relevant to my post are roughly 85-94. The particular image I used is from 92. – zibadawa timmy Jun 30 at 21:17
  • In the early age only he realised people see monsters as getting killed by heros in the end no matter how powerful they are. In some cases many heros comes to fight one monster. He couldn't able to bear it. That's why he thought he will not be a hero, instead called as monster & let other heros, civilians know monster can also defeat heros. But, what saitama posists that Garou wanted to be a hero...... Found it difficult & gave up. No, he never tried fighting real hero. How he can give it up? – P Satish Patro Jul 17 at 1:29
  • From starting only his aim was to realise monstes can defeat heros. But, if this is correct, why he is not joining monster association is not known. May be lame or something else – P Satish Patro Jul 17 at 1:34
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    @PSatishPatro His ideal is his ideal, and things either live up to it or they don't. The Monster Association may have their own ideas and ideals, but those aren't Garou's. And you asked "why is he not joining [them]?", the simple answer to which is that he has no interest in them and considers their behaviors (like the killing obsession) to be inconsistent with his ideal of monsters. Even monsters working in an organized fashion doesn't jive well with his picture of monsters as hardworking individualists. – zibadawa timmy Jul 17 at 2:59