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I was listening to the original song used as the opening for the first season of Hakuōki, and I realized that the tempo in the original was slower. I also listened to Vampire Knight's opening, and READY STEADY GO!, which was used as one of the openings for the original Fullmetal Alchemist anime, and they too had slower tempos than I originally thought.

I know that when a song is used as an opening for an anime, it gets cut down to about 1 minute (in most cases it's about 1/3 of the original). But does the song also get edited so it plays faster, or is this increase in tempo a result of the quality being dropped?

  • If the song was made for the anime, it wouldn't make much sense to change its tempo afterwards. – Omega Oct 25 '13 at 2:35
  • @Omega for Hakuōki i don't think it was made just for the anime, it was done by Yoshioka Aika and i have the Soundtrack which has 2 songs on it and instrumental versions of them – Memor-X Oct 25 '13 at 2:46
  • Sometimes the harmony for a specific verse in an OP / ED is altered for the TV show. – krikara Oct 25 '13 at 5:10
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As far as I know, theme songs are picked or created based on the anime's themes (if the song is appropriate with the anime's story) and its length will only be cut shorter while the tempo will stay the same (with the exception of course if the production decided to have another version of the opening to include in their OST).

However, most anime openings have faster tempo than endings to have that kind of "excitement feel" or some kind of "momentum" as an anime starts. But it really depends on the theme of the anime. If the anime has a tragic theme or a sad love story theme, sometimes production decides to have an opening song that has lower tempo, or a sad song, but mostly, it will have a faster tempo than its ending.

  • what about ending songs? i know that the ending for ergo proxy is heavily cut from radiohead's "paranoid android", but not sped up/slowed. – Vogel612 Oct 25 '13 at 15:03
  • I'm not saying that what I answered was what the production "always" do. It's what "most" of them do. It really depends on the production's decision. – xjshiya Oct 29 '13 at 0:14

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