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In season 1 episode 8 of Kaguya-sama: Love Is War, Miyuki's sister Kei and Chika say to each other 'konnichi sappo'. (A YouTube video showing the scene)

What does this mean?

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    Guess: konnichiwa (hello) mixed with "wassup" = konnichi sappo. But the subtitle is not helping. Why it says "Hello, my sis"? Mar 31 at 10:46
  • @FumikageTokoyami oh thanks. didn't notice that. in the subs in my copy of the episode it really just says 'konnichi sappo'. aaahhhh 'sappo' is like from the 'sup' in 'wassup' !?!?!??!
    – BCLC
    Mar 31 at 11:06
  • @FumikageTokoyami Update: what do you think of Andrew's answer please? 'it's unlikely to be interpreted as "wassup" since it would have been written as katakana instead for loan word, not a particular kanji that has a specific meaning. And it should have been pronounced as (wa)sappu or (wa)zappu with 'u' instead of 'o'. – Aki Tanaka♦'
    – BCLC
    Apr 1 at 6:43
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    Unfortunately, I am not a speaker of Japanese language. So, that was just my hunch. Anyways, Aki's answer looks correct, so +1 to him (and to your question too). Apr 3 at 3:16
  • @FumikageTokoyami Good hunch. My personal take is that it's double entendre, so you're both right.
    – BCLC
    Apr 3 at 11:51

1 Answer 1

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It is kind of difficult to translate/give this expression a meaning since it is a self-created introduction, but...

Based on the original manga, the wording is こんにち殺法 (konnichi-sappou), a portmanteau of こんにちは (konnichiwa) + 殺法 (sappou), which then is replied with こんにち殺法返し, a portmanteau of konnichiwa + sappou + 返し (-gaeshi).

According to Jisho, sappou means "way of murdering; killing method; way of using a sword" while kaeshi (read as -gaeshi here) means reversal; return. 〇〇-sappou is often used as a killer technique name, while adding -gaeshi to it means the counter for such technique.

Usage of sappou used in this way is kind of rare. 円月殺法 (engetsu sappou) was a popular technique coined by Renzaburō Shibata in his novel series Nemuri Kyoshiro (a YouTube video demonstrating the technique in real-life competition). On the other hand, the usage of -gaeshi is more common, as can be seen in Judo techniques.

So, if trying to give meaning to these expressions, then perhaps "die to/with hello!" and "counter to/with hello!" might be suitable...

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  • Thanks Andrew. Based on what Fumikage Tokoyami, is 'sappo' perhaps like a double entendre or something: sappo as in sword and sappo as in wassup(po) ?
    – BCLC
    Apr 1 at 2:59
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    @BCLC it's unlikely to be interpreted as "wassup" since it would have been written as katakana instead for loan word, not a particular kanji that has a specific meaning. And it should have been pronounced as (wa)sappu or (wa)zappu with 'u' instead of 'o'.
    – Aki Tanaka
    Apr 1 at 4:46

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