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Maybe related: Attire for a Japanese fireworks festival: Why does Miyuki (Shirogane) REALLY attend in school uniform?


In the s2 finale, Takao, Nakai and Nishikata don't wear yukata's while their dates / companions (resp Kimura, Mano and Takagi) do. What's up with this? Is it something specific to this series? Or in Japanese culture in general are girls more likely than boys to dress up?

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We can see this trend continue when Nishikata observes other couples / pairs:

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Hamaguchi (with Houjou) is an exception though. Good for Hamaguchi:

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Kimura (with Takao) is an exception too.

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in Japanese culture in general are girls more likely than boys to dress up?

Yes. Girls just like dressing up pretty more than boys. I guess it is universal.


A quick search gave the following.

It shows the answer to question 'Do you have yukata?'. Only 23% of men(男性) have it while 66% of women(女性) have yukata.

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This is just personal opinion, but generally Japanese traditional wear (kimono, yukata) are less convenient than Western clothes. It is less comfortable to move in, harder to wash, usually more expensive. So men, who generally care less about attire, don't bother to wear them, except perhaps in traditional Japanese inns (ryokan), where yukata's are provided as a kind of bath robe.

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Part of it is historical. In the Shogun era, merchants began to get rich, and their conspicuous consumption caused the aristocrats to write draconian sumptuary laws that stated what commoners couldn't wear. They didn't worry about women so much, but men's garments became very plain. Also the merchants decided that if they displayed too much wealth in public they were likely to be robbed by samurai. So men's yukata and kimono have been pretty dull ever since- commonly indigo. Also, it seems like guys don't like to call attention to themselves, so they're less likely to dress up. Most modern yukata and kimono for men are dull as dishwater. The exception is the juban, which is an under-kimono, which wouldn't be seen in public. Those often feature hand-painted artwork, often signed.

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