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In One Piece, whenever strong people are executed, the executioners in khaki getups are the ones to do it, even though they are much weaker than the people they execute.

for ex:- At Marineford when Ace was getting executed, the executioners got injured by Crocodile and they still called extra executioners after this. Why didn't Sengoku or anyone else do it? The new executioners weren't even strong enough to stand against Luffy's haki.

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For an example :

When Ace was being executed at Marineford, the Fleet Admiral, the 3 Admirals, the Vice-Admirals etc. were placed at strategic locations for the upcoming war with the Whitebeard Pirates. The Navy knew Whitebeard was gonna make a fantastic entry into the battlefield(not HOW he would enter Marineford). So, it was necessary for all the high-ranking Marines to be ever-ready for war. Naturally, the task of executing Ace was given to the weaker Marines.

This policy is followed in all the Navy executions to be prepared for a fight with the Criminal's NAKAMAS

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Nonsense?

This questions begs another: is power scaling in One Piece nonsense? In particular, in the navy?

I believe we can answer this by examining the character of Koby. At the beginning of the series, he is a weakling. Yet, in a very short time, he learns the same superhuman speed technique CP9 was using.

This in turn begs the question of why the rest of the navy doesn't at the very least learn this technique. There are only two possible reasons as to why they don't: the first is that it's kept secret and the second is that they're all just too lazy to do the training. Both of these are nonsensical. The first because the threat of the pirates is so dire that it would be an incredulous thing for the higher-ups to not to be teaching this to everyone. The second is nonsense because these are all men who volunteered to fight pirates. They're dedicated to that cause, and so are the people training them. Granted, there will be a few slackers, but it would be ridiculous if the majority of the marines were too lazy to do training. We should definitely be seeing a lot more navy soldiers using these techniques if Koby can learn it so quickly. Even accounting for Garp being a great teacher or something, and Koby's timetable being accelerated, the other navy soldiers have had years to hone their skills, which should be plenty of time.

And yet, we rarely see marines using these techniques.

So yes, the power scaling in One Piece is nonsense, and that's the reason the executioners are so weak. I would argue the same thing for any series that follows the Sorting Algorithm of Evil trope.

The world is inherently broken. That being said, we can still answer this question with canonical information, which I will do in the following sections.

In General

They call the executioners to execute pirates because that's the executioners' job. The executioners even wear special uniforms, so it's obvious they've been separated from the rest of the marines for this function. It is also important to note that it is not the job of the highest ranking officers to execute captured pirates.

What separates the navy and the pirates (in the navy's mind, at least) is that they carry out justice in a fair and orderly manner. This includes using executioners wearing the proper ceremonial attire and doing things by the book.

The navy wants to project strength and reinforce the idea that they're the good guys in the eyes of the whole world. To do that, it doesn't make sense to have the admirals execute captured pirates. These are the pillars of justice that everyone should look up to. Instead, the dirty job of execution should be left to those specifically appointed to do it.

Executioner Uniform:

executioners

Normal Uniform:

normal uniform

Ace's Execution

In terms of strategy during White Beard's attack, it also doesn't make sense to have the admirals execute Ace. Ace is completely subdued, so that's a job that can be done by anyone with the arm strength to swing a halberd. The admirals can instead participate in the battle and defend the scaffold so the execution is not interrupted.

Additionally, it's bad optics for the admirals to do the job instead of the people who are supposed to do it--in other words, by being unable to do things the right way, it would be a sign that the World Government and justice slipped up, which would stain their credibility.

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  • No, there is no such hidden assumption. I only mean the executioners must be blissfully unaware of the danger of the person the are executing. As Ace, Roger etc. can easily kill them if it meant their freedom (i.e. under normals circumstances). Oct 29, 2023 at 16:22
  • by saying new executioners weren't even strong enough to stand against Luffy's haki I meant there are stronger people "available" for marine's dirty work. Although, I understand the sheer shortage of such talented people. Which is easy to take for granted sometime. Oct 29, 2023 at 16:27
  • @SuperSaiyan99000 Your hidden assumption is the same as the one in this question: anime.stackexchange.com/questions/36983/… and the answer to both questions is that too much power scaling (leveling up with training, etc) makes any story nonsensical. Luffy's haki stops the executioners because the story demands that Ace not die at that moment. Power/weakness of the characters is simply a casualty of that necessity. And you specifically asked why the navy admirals weren't the ones carrying out the execution. I answered that. Nov 1, 2023 at 23:37
  • Furthermore, I extrapolated from the existing information in the story. For instance, you believe it is nonsensical that the executioners are so weak. I would agree, actually. Yet, that the executioners are weak is a fact. Therefore, the only way to objectively answer this question is to extrapolate from there. There has to be a reason. And the reason is that the navy does things by the book. There is further evidence of that as well. Nov 1, 2023 at 23:39
  • Though perhaps my usage of "hidden assumption" was poorly done. After all, I did not actually state what the assumption was. I cannot fault you for being confused. The fault was mine. However, I do not see any error in the assertions I made besides that. Nov 1, 2023 at 23:43

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