4

The weakness of Zombie of Thriller Bark is salt.

When salt is thrown into a zombie's mouth, the shadow moving the corpse is detached and the zombie is purified. Because salt is a property of sea water and since the shadow was attached due to a Devil Fruit power, the shadow is naturally released.

If Brook nullified Moriah's Devil Fruit power with salt, does this mean no Devil Fruit user can eat salt?

  • 1
    Note that salt is traditionally linked to mystical purification, probably due to it's use as a preservative; this is true for both western and eastern cultures. Salt-in-mouth is I believe one of the usual ways to keep (at least some) undead from rising, with zombies having their mouths sewn shut to keep it there. – Clockwork-Muse May 22 '14 at 12:36
8

No, this is just the special weakness of that particular Devil Fruit.

I mean, Luffy eats everything, nearly everywhere. And in the most dishes there is salt, or how do you cook you spaghetti?

Another instance to prove my opinion is that Luffy had gone underwater several times and had nearly drowned. In the process, he also "ate" salt, but it had no effect, like losing his Devil Fruit power.

  • 1
    you have a point here for your second prove... I thought they have some kind of special diet or something – Darjeeling May 22 '14 at 7:13
  • i thought about this too, but if you know Luffy and how he eats everthing, he would have died a long time ago xD – Kjenos May 22 '14 at 7:20
  • 6
    This answer is correct but ignores why. In (some) haitian traditions a zombie is created by walking near the bed of another sleeping individual, trapping their soul by blowing it over a bottle, and walking back to your home backwards with the bottle. Without their soul, they wither and die. You open the bottle over the grave and they return to life as your slave. The zombie thinks it is alive but has no free will. Iff, however, it tastes any amount of salt, it will remember it is dead and go back to its grave against orders. This story is the inspiration for one piece zombies. – kaine May 22 '14 at 18:15
  • wow thx, give this man an award. great explanation. – Kjenos May 23 '14 at 4:53
1

Note: Salt is generally used to symbolize purification so it was used to express the release of the curse of this Devil Fruit.

1.Luffy loves fun and the meat doesn't spoil. They would need salt to preserve there meat as pirates especially on the first less developed ship.

  1. Ace and Luffy would have died by food. What better way to killed two famous pirates who love food than by poisoning their food?

  2. Somebody would have warned Luffy in chapter 1 like about swimming.

  3. Each fruit has it's own individual weakness and strengths. Like fire < water, fire > smoke

  4. Luffy touched a Seastone that had to have salt on it.

  5. Luffy has fallen in water and most likely seawater at least once.

So I conclude that salt does not effect all Devil Fruit users.

0

I don't remember which episode it was, but Sanji especially collected salt for the ship kitchen. So I don't think it is the issue. Salt harm is zombie specific, not devil-fruit eaters. Not everything connected to the sea is bad :)

0

The curse will only take effect on sea water, not on something taken/extracted from the sea (which naturally includes salt). Remember in Water 7 episode, where Sanji was challenged by an old man to find the secret ingredient of his fried rice? And the secret spice is actually the SALT, which was visible remain after the cataclysm of Aqua Laguna.

And so it was, Sanji applied the new SALT to his cooking, and all Luffy's crew were astonished by the new flavour.

0

If it were to be true then Luffy would also be unable to eat fish and I think they would contain a fair amount of salt. So yeah, salt should be fine in a Devil Fruit user's diet

  • Could you clarify the bit about "they would contain a fair amount of salt"? – Maroon May 22 '14 at 14:09
  • @Maroon Fish would contain a fair amount of salt, or be salty anyways. The fish that live in the ocean anyways – Lunchbox May 22 '14 at 14:10

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