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18

MAD are probably refer to a broader classification of AMV from Japan. According to the Nico Nico Pedia: MAD refers to video and/or audio created by editing and rearranging existing video or audio, to give it new meaning. Basically, they are derivative, fan creations. The name is probably derived from "MAD Tapes" from the 80s-90s which was the fad in ...


8

This is actually a legal gray area. Typically, since nobody's making money of of them, the copyright holders don't usually pursue the claim. But it is ultimately at the whim of the copyright holder. The conventions typically get permission from their sponsors to do AMV screenings, the content show is usually owned by at least one of the sponsors. As they see ...


5

The very elaborate, meticulously-edited AMVs set to popular music that you see from creators like Nostromo are, as far as I know, mostly the domain of non-Japanese fans. Naturally, I can't prove that there aren't any made by Japanese people, but I've spent my fair share of time bumbling around on Niconico, and haven't seen anything of the sort. What ...


5

This seems like an awfully fuzzy thing to try to delineate. I'm going to claim that the answer to your question is "you classify an AMV as an ASMV whenever you think that sounds like the right thing to do". See, the thing is, "ASMV" is strictly a piece of fandom jargon that sees no use outside a small sub-subcommunity of the subcommunity of AMV creators. As ...


5

As unpopular as this is likely to be... AMVs at US-based anime conventions are fairly flagrant copyright violations. They are clearly derivative works, using the artwork of an anime to either summarize the story or create a different story from the original work. The American copyright law summarizes this fairly clearly: A “derivative work” is a work ...


5

No matter what license standing of a copyrighted work, all copyright violations are persecuted only on demand of the affected entity (or entity acting on their behalf and request, e.g. BSA acting on behalf of software manufacturers.) That means: no complaint = no lawsuit. The copyright holders are fully within their right to sue the fans for statutory ...


3

That depends on the country, the convention and the concrete copyright holders, I believe. For example, in USA (and some other countries), there is so-called "fair use". It takes different form from country to country, but in USA, as an example, it works like this (from this wikipedia article): Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 ...


2

I found the video: http://www.nicovideo.jp/watch/sm2931268 The tags I was looking for are: ツッコミカルタ and アニメかるたリンク


1

I think MAD and AMV is one. MAD is shorted for "music anime douga", similar to "anime music video" aka AMV. There's lots of pages saying that these two are actually one kind of fan-made video, too.


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