38

Sazae-san (still ongoing) holds the Guinness World Record for the longest running animated television series at more than 7071 episodes. For a list of runner-ups, check this list.


37

Definition1 cour [koor] noun One of the four conventional three-month periods of television broadcasting in Japan (January to March; April to June; July to September; October to December): "Noragami" aired during the first cour of 2014. A portion of a television program aired over the course of one cour1: The big reveal at the end of the first ...


33

I believe Japan's obscenity laws have some particular rules regarding pubic hair. Also, often hentai artists prefer a hairless body for their particular demographic / fetish / etc. Up until the mid 1990s, pubic hair had to be censored in Japanese media. The law has been relaxed since, but as it had been common to do without hair, many artists continued with ...


30

There are a variety of reasons for this. Some may apply and some may not. The anime series catches up to the Source Material This is by far the most common problem, faced by long running Anime. Once the source material ends there are two options. Fillers or hiatus. Anime like Naruto and Bleach went the filler route. Bleach ended before the final saga which ...


29

TL;DR - It's because financially, it pays off for longer, more popular anime series. It allows them to retain broadcasting slot, as well as sponsors and advertisers, by sacrificing a bit of quality. First, it needs to be pointed out that many anime don't have filler. Filler episodes are only common in long-running popular anime such as One Piece, Naruto, or ...


27

In Japan, the term is called eyecatch, which is also known as bumper. As the question has mentioned, it's usually to indicate the start and end of the commercial break. In broadcasting, a commercial bumper, ident bumper or break-bumper (often shortened to bump) is a brief announcement, usually two to fifteen seconds in length that can contain a voice over, ...


23

Okay, based on what I've learned here, I think I understand why you're asking this question - it looks like it boils down to the fact American television and anime use the word "season" differently. The way anime is produced nowadays is that the production of a second season is almost always strongly contingent on the commercial success of the ...


21

There is no written path, but there are several factors and steps that must happen for that: Fanbase The overall reaction to the manga, the volume of internet traffic it generates (fan-art, forums, discussions, fan pages, fan fiction, even porn of the main characters). Are fans cosplaying as the characters even before anime? Connections and reputation ...


21

It is for financial reasons. In the past, many series had longer seasons: 24, 26 or 28 episodes for a season was common in the 90s (Meitantei Conan's first season was 28 episodes). Series that were pretty guaranteed to be popular enough to keep up selling a lot of toys to kids had longer seasons (Sailor Moon's first season had 46 episodes). Gag series from ...


19

There are sooo many anime series (and manga for that matter), that broadcasting companies don't know which will be hits and which won't be at the time of establishing a contract with a studio. The fact is, when a studio gets the green light to do a series, it is typically one season; that is, with the exception of some of the Jump comics that have long-...


19

Several reasons: Production cost, first impression, spoilers. Theme songs are commonly used to save money on production. Draw that opening once and show 90 seconds of a roughly 22-minute episode every time. And there is also an ending which is a double value :p When a series is only starting, you might want to make it interesting right away, and not just ...


18

Presumably it's to fit into the standard 30 minute time slot allocated for the show. 20 min. episode 3 min. OP + ED (90 seconds each) Commercials And it's about 30 minutes.


18

Anime is a Japanese loanword used to refer to any sort of animation. Outside of Japan, in other countries, anime is generally considered to be a type of a cartoon. You can make a cartoon in a style similar to anime, but it can't truly be considered an anime. Why not, you ask? Animation differs by region. This can be because of the different techniques used,...


18

You have two questions here: What exactly is this treaty? and Does it really have so much control over anime? The Treaty of San Francisco they reference is otherwise known as the Treaty of Peace with Japan. Representatives from 51 countries worked together to create this treaty at an opera house in San Francisco, CA. The treaty was ratified by 48 of ...


16

Mangas are usually written by one person, called the mangaka. The mangaka has to come up with creative ideas, original scenery, character expressions and dialogues while making sure that the story flow is coherent and planning ahead to pick up the story in the next chapter and see if he/she can take it from there. The mangaka first has to draw everything in ...


16

This seems to happen in most regions. The typical reasons I've seen given are: shows don't all start on the same day or even the same week sometimes airtime slots are occupied by sports, seasonal, or other non-regular programs networks may choose not to broadcast new episodes on holidays with historically low viewership shows are sometimes only given an ...


16

As Justin Sevakis mentions in his article on The Anime Economy: Anime production is an extremely labor-intensive proposition, employing the services of up to 2,000 people per episode around the world. Most of the grunt work is now done in third world countries across Asia, and the use of digital technology has reduced costs across the board. Anime ...


16

First of all, I doubt they'd look at any scripts not written in Japanese. Second of all, I'm rather doubtful you'd have much success simply pitching an idea to a studio as a person outside the industry. There are, however, many venues to get an idea made into an anime, eventually, but these venues require the person who came up with the idea to produce ...


15

Yuri is a genre. It, like any other genre - drama, action, romance, adventure, slice-of-life, etc - is part of what will define the particular plot the show will have. It by itself isn't a demographic, which is what defines the target audience. Many yuri-centric works actually do have a demographic attached to it explicitly. For example, Girl Friends is ...


15

Dubbing is expensive; subbing is much cheaper to do. Anime translation companies usually want to dub because they have no shot at getting it aired on TV outside of Japan if there is no dub, so they usually sell the subbed DVDs etc. for about the same amount of money as the dubbed ones, in order for the sales of the subs to to offset the larger cost of ...


15

Please see the latter part of the answer to Is intentionally producing a lower quality TV release unique to anime?: American cartoon viewers are very particular about the quality. My friend who is a key-frames animator for The Simpsons told me that there is one animator whose entire job is just to animate the mouth movements, because if the mouth movement ...


15

This is a matter of artistic style and a branding strategy. As a prime example: Studio Ghibli films are arguably the highest-quality anime produced. They painstakingly aim for realism in the movements of characters and objects and the backgrounds are lush and extremely detailed. The balance of light and shadow accurately matches real life, and every cell ...


15

It may come to a surprise for you, but the anime you typically watch is not what is considered mainstream in its country of origin, unless of course you watch shows made for children and families. In fact, most of the anime that the international community consumes are what is called "late night anime." The overall ratings on these TV series are so low that ...


14

On their own, Yes. Obviously this is a fairly blanket statement and is hard to qualify because of secrecies in company financials, but I think it's reasonable to assert. I also realise I'm not directly answering your question about dropped manga adaptions, but addressing the question broadly. I think most points probably apply to that situation also, but ...


14

Just like in this answer, let's take a look at /u/homu's data. This basically answers your question right here: between 8% and 15% (avg. 10%) of anime in each year from 2000-2013 were based on a video game of some variety. Games are a minor but not insignificant source for anime. Now, if you're asking "what percentage of video games get turned into an ...


14

For illustrative purposes, I have taken the first four images off a Google search for eyes (note: you may not want to perform this search yourself, as there is at least one disturbing image on the front page). As you can see, all of these images contain a similar "white space" / highlight. That's because if you're taking a photo, you need a light ...


14

The origin of yuri comes from Class S novels. This genre was created 100 years ago. In this time, the main readers of Class S novels were girls. In 70s, the word yuri is created by the editor of Barazoku (rose tribe, the magazine for gays). But Yuri still targets girl or lesbians. In 90s to 00s, these yuri novels/manga were found by fanboys. Ex. Sailor ...


14

I've done some searching about the names like this, and I wasn't able to find any particular explanation. Some people say it's just for style, other argue that the × is another form of "vs" (which kind of makes some sense), or "and" (like &), or "with". (Not to mention that it might also mean "kisses" like in "xoxo" = "hugs and kisses", but that's most ...


13

Your question is somehow related to this question. Sometimes, an animated character is better suited for being voiced by a voice actor of the opposite sex. Maybe a higher voice is needed for a male, or a lower voice for a female. A common variant for this is for young boys, usually 12 and under, to be voiced by an adult woman. This is because ...


13

Basically: Fundamentally, all anime today is produced at a rate of 24 frames per second. This is the same framerate used for most (all?) film today (e.g. in Hollywood movies). For a filmmaker with a camera, this just means setting your camera to expose 24 frames of film each second. But for an animator, this means drawing 24 images for each second of ...


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