33

I believe Japan's obscenity laws have some particular rules regarding pubic hair. Also, often hentai artists prefer a hairless body for their particular demographic / fetish / etc. Up until the mid 1990s, pubic hair had to be censored in Japanese media. The law has been relaxed since, but as it had been common to do without hair, many artists continued with ...


19

The law that most people cite as the reason for Japanese censorship is Article 175 of the Criminal Code of Japan (passed in 1907). Interestingly, Article 21 of the Japanese constitution prohibits censorship, so legally Article 175 isn't actually censorship, though it's pretty hard to argue this in practical terms. The translation of Article 175 of the ...


18

Censored creatures: Likely little. As @Torisuda has mentioned, there's no incentive for them to create pokemon that toe the line - it's a show for kids, they will want innocent monsters. Sexual content/innuendoes A definite no go area for a kids show Violence (gore, mutilations, etc.) Considering pokemon only 'faint' and there is purposefully no death ...


13

In general, Sailor Moon was heavily edited for the US release as detailed by fans for example here. In particular nudity was avoided as exemplified below. The source of these images is this comparison between the US and the German version. While the German version is not completely uncensored (see the linked site for details) it is almost equal to the ...


13

There's a Manga Censorship panel at Comic con that talks a bit about habits in Manga, of note: Fujimoto also pointed out the particular demographic stratification of manga into shonen, shojo, seinen and josei (boys, girls, men and women) genres, resulting in a product range that spans all ages. Each of the various manga magazines published in Japan is ...


12

Though I watched the original English dub when it first aired on TV in the U.S., I do not follow any of the details about it, so I will not attempt to answer the first half of your question, but I can answer the second half. Was it originally meant for children? Yes. Both the manga and the classic 90s anime were primarily aimed at elementary school-aged ...


12

The FCC, the government body responsible for broadcasting media, does not have any specific laws against animation that comes from Japan, otherwise known as anime. Because the 1st amendment protects the Freedom of Expression, the censorship laws that are in place and enforced by the FCC in the U.S are concerned with obscenity, indecency, and profanity. The ...


11

You are over-thinking it. I guess we only talk about official localizations here, since in non-official ones, anything can be done. When an official localization is made, some kind of contract is being signed between the possessor of rights for the manga (the author, a publishing house, doesn't matter), and the company that is going to make the localization....


11

Simply put, nobody wants to see the vomit of anyone as it is so creepy and disgusting that even children will not like it. There can be many reasons behind this: 1. Gross and disgusting or creepy According to me, no one wants see any character who is simply vomiting and taking out all his food. The vomit chain reaction It's like when one character ...


9

This is just how anime shows "a very disgusting thing vaguely shaped and colored like this". It's not a new thing, off the top of my head I can remember one other instance for which we have a question here: Why are there censored/retracted art when there is no problem and here's the video of that fragment. Also see this question and its answer: Why do they ...


8

I don't really follow Yu-Gi-Oh anymore, but I think this can be explained on purely linguistic grounds. Leaving Obelisk (and "Slifer") aside for a moment, Ra and Osiris take as their namesakes beings that we, in English, call gods. Ra is "an Egyptian god" because he was worshipped by the Egyptian people, and the same is true of Osiris. So we call their Yu-...


7

You are correct that it is about a rush of timing during the initial broadcast of the series. The Sailor Moon Crystal Failures website is maintaining a log of Toei's initial run screenshots with their Blu-Ray revisions. Toei was running behind from the beginning (it originally announced that Sailor Moon Crystal would start in summer of 2013, but the release ...


4

The whole show was highly censored, as shown in this comparison album (Obviously spoilers): https://imgur.com/a/tvt2r The main reason is Japanese censorship laws, which are very different from laws in the West, but some people have mentioned that S2 was airing at the same time as some ISIS attacks took place, thus this might have something to do with TV ...


3

I'm a little late to the party, but I think it might be more of an artistic choice than anything else. Victor's arm is probably there to protect their own private moment together instead of it being due to censorship reasons. There's a post on tumblr here that cites Kubo-sensei's tweet as an 'official' confirmation of the kiss. I'm a complete novice at ...


3

TV Tropes has a page on the shadow censorship, which is essentially the same thing. The basic idea comes from overall censorship laws, such as exist in Japan. As this article mentions, a common means of censoring genitals is a "mozaiku" or mosaic, which is pretty much just a pixelization of the area. This page talks about the airbrushing over of female ...


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