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The etiquette shouldn't differ much, if at all, between cons. But here's just a short checklist for you. Be sure to respect the rules. Most conventions have a set of rules on their websites, more often even several. Take for example the dutch animecon which has general house rules and recording/photography rules. Most of these are updated every year, so be ...


17

First, Check if there is a fan website that catalogues the produced figures for the series you're interested in. Check the catalogues at MyFigureCollection.net, make an account, and consult collectors there. Browse the website of the Japanese manufacturer/s that produce the official figures and familiarize yourself with them (even if you don't read Japanese,...


15

One rule that is heavily emphasized at the cons I've been to is: please, please, please Observe basic hygiene practises Conventions can smell really, really bad: Lots of people --> Heat to enduce sweat Lots of costumes made of unbreathable material --> Sweaty cosplayers Close proximity of seats --> Your nose being close to the sweat. Anime fans and ...


13

You are correct: Comiket is the world's largest convention for selling/buying doujinshi, and includes cosplayers. However, it is not an anime/manga convention and as an experience is pretty much nothing like Comic Con or similar conventions to Comic Con such as Anime Expo. Yes, Comiket only exists in Japan, as over 550,000 Japanese doujinshika (a.k.a. ...


11

Of the things that I've done when attending conventions: Cosplay doesn't mean consent. I realize that's more catch-termy than anything else, but it translates to something very simple; just because someone's dressed up for the event doesn't mean that they want or have to take a picture with you. Some conventions even have specific areas for this to take ...


9

Been numerous times to this convention (as a pro and as a visitor). Most of the publisher booths are from French publishers. Panels, activities are in French and speakers are in French. Some panels don't really require to understand French though (cosplay). Some video projections are in English but it is rare. Most of the booths will speak English, but it ...


8

This is actually a legal gray area. Typically, since nobody's making money of of them, the copyright holders don't usually pursue the claim. But it is ultimately at the whim of the copyright holder. The conventions typically get permission from their sponsors to do AMV screenings, the content show is usually owned by at least one of the sponsors. As they see ...


8

To identify for fake goods, sometimes you'll have to check the official website for how the goods actually looks like. This is not always available though as not all company provides pictures of the goods in their website. GOOD SMILE is one of the companies that do. You can check it here. Basically the fakes are of lower quality. If its sculpting is not ...


7

Following up on some stories I heard of yaoi fans I know from conventions, and a lot of trips on the WayBack machine to find old/deleted posts following the first ban, I came down to this pretty consistent story both online and among the fans. The original yaoi paddle was made as a prank between 2 friends. The one receiving it was a yaoi manga/doujishin ...


6

Although Jay Fubler Harvey's massive Anime Web Turnpike web directory of over 40,000 links unfortunately went offline in November 2014 after being acquired by The Anime Broadcasting Network, Inc., the classic version is still visible at archive.org. The Anime Conventions page lists all of the main anime and/or manga conventions that had come into existence ...


6

I have not attended previous meetings of this convention, but I can tell from my professional knowledge that: It is the largest in all Europe. Many of the guests come from Japan. This convention is considered a professional meeting point in the world of manga/anime, and as far as I know from my colleagues who have attended, all the meetings are in English. ...


5

As unpopular as this is likely to be... AMVs at US-based anime conventions are fairly flagrant copyright violations. They are clearly derivative works, using the artwork of an anime to either summarize the story or create a different story from the original work. The American copyright law summarizes this fairly clearly: A “derivative work” is a work ...


5

No matter what license standing of a copyrighted work, all copyright violations are persecuted only on demand of the affected entity (or entity acting on their behalf and request, e.g. BSA acting on behalf of software manufacturers.) That means: no complaint = no lawsuit. The copyright holders are fully within their right to sue the fans for statutory ...


4

It seems that it is a primarily time-management strategy. From the Oyahocon Cosplay Competition rules (bold text mine): The music and/or prerecorded dialogue must be ready to go as soon as it is put the CD player (this means the participant must edit the music and/or prerecorded dialogue before the convention and put it on a CD). Audio file must be ...


3

Both Comiket and COMITIA is a doujinshi convention held in Japan. Both conventions are generally the same event with several differences. See What events usually happen at Comiket? Main Focus While both Comiket and COMITIA main focus are socializing and exchange doujinshi, and although Comiket also have completely original self-published content. COMITIA ...


3

I've been reading several articles and blog posts about this and I tweeted at a couple of the larger American conventions and one got back to me. Otakon said that their main demographic is 18 to 28 year olds. Anime Midwest is not as big as Otakon, but several places online mention the average age is about 17/18. - "Anime-Midwest: Dear God, I'm Old" Anime ...


3

That depends on the country, the convention and the concrete copyright holders, I believe. For example, in USA (and some other countries), there is so-called "fair use". It takes different form from country to country, but in USA, as an example, it works like this (from this wikipedia article): Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 ...


2

You can also find a list of anime and comic conventions on UpcomingCons.com. For just anime, click through to the anime page. I also don't collect merchandise much, and even though vendors rooms are a big part of the cons, there are also lots of guests to meet, along with a lot of cool cosplays.


2

Adding ontop of the other points these people have made which I'm going to take from this post How to Spot Bootleg Figurines Whilst MyFigureCollection is a great place to source these figurines, it's worth noting it's not 100% guaranteed to stop fakes from filtering through, one common issue at Comic & Anime conventions is that stalls which sell ...


1

A good place to find upcoming anime conventions is animecons.com. You can choose specifically what year you would like to look at and in which area. They provide information about anime conventions all around the world, not just America. They provide the dates, name of the con, and the location. It also gives you information about the con (e.g. who runs it, ...


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