26

I think it's a combination of a few factors. First, there's a sort of ethical code among some fansubbers that dictates that they fansub for "the love of anime" or something to that effect, and that it's improprietous to profit off of fansubbing. I'm not sure how effective a reminder of this sort would be to people who don't subscribe to the same ethical ...


19

This is a matter of international copyright law, and as such is fairly complicated and depends on where you live. However, for most of the developed world the laws are fairly standardized and so, if you're willing to paint with broad brush-strokes and ignore technical nuances, the laws are all pretty universal. Most countries in the world are parties to ...


14

No? [...] are they Freeware and Shareware? First things first, we have some terminology confusion here. Nobody describes anything besides computer software as "freeware" and/or "shareware". Manga is not software. Manga, like other creative works, are generally encumbered by copyright, the entire point of which is that the creator (i.e. not you) has ...


12

I was a consumer of fansubs in the early-mid 90's. This statement has no bearing on my answer, however, I was pointing it out because someone thought it would be interesting to hear from a pre-Internet fansub consumer. All of these answers are valid. Ultimately, the fan sub groups need legal authorities to know that profit is not expected or accepted. It's ...


11

For legal questions such as these, it is always good to contact a copyright lawyer in your country. Laws regarding fair use, copyrights and the likes differ per country, and a copyright lawyer should be more than capable of answering your questions. And this answer should not be seen as legal advice. Beyond that, yes, you'd likely need a license. And should ...


10

This is a pretty straightforward issue. If you live in a country that is a signatory to the Berne Convention (which is most countries), you are required to respect Japanese copyright law (and likewise, Japanese people are required to respect your country's copyright law). Japanese copyright law (like most copyright law) forbids the unauthorized ...


9

Legally, you will almost definitely need a license. In fact, pretty much all fan merch (including fanart) is technically illegal or at least in a legal gray area - there is little preventing companies with copyright ownership from striking down on such things, other than bad publicity. That said, there is a general unspoken agreement, especially for Japanese ...


9

Assuming that with posters you mean the manga cover images and/or anime cover images. Then no, they do not have to pay for displaying these. Often these images either fall under the Fair use of thumbnails on the internet Use thumbnail images (150 pixels). These small images are generally considered fair game for artwork and photography, so a book cover ...


7

To understand the Japanese law, you need to learn the idea of "Antragsdelikt" (親告罪, shinkokuzai). This means if copyright holder doesn't complain about the doujinshi, it's not illegal. Most publishers in Japan don't prohibit doujinshi (at least explicitly), thus it's not illegal. It's because many commercial manga authors also create doujinshi, and ...


7

Simply put: Yes, you will need to license your content. Whether it is for-profit or free of charge, you are still dealing with copyrighted content. If you want to distribute this copyrighted content legally, you will need to license it. When doing this, make sure the license terms actually allow this kind of distribution. Otherwise you are operating no ...


5

I've watched the original (now pulled) and the edited version (currently on CrunchyRoll). The only change I noticed was with regards to the dialogue in the play which Shizuka attends, about 11 minutes into the episode. The original dialogue was clearly taken from Samuel Beckett's famous play Waiting for Godot. This play is still copyrighted. To make things ...


5

For legal questions such as these, it is always good to contact a copyright lawyer in your country. Laws regarding fair use, copyrights and the likes differ per country, and a copyright lawyer should be more than capable of answering your questions. And this answer should not be seen as legal advice. What you are describing is fan fiction/derivative work, ...


4

Like what Memor-X said in his comment, you can't download a manga and then share it around. Like other works, manga is also subject to copyright law. Normally the copyright holder would be either the author or the publisher, depending on their contract. Popular artists such as Mashima Hiro, Masashi Kishimoto, and Kubo Tite would most likely have the ...


3

Even though in some countries, translations of original works are considered original works themselves, the copyright laws are still pretty vague, and so to avoid getting in trouble, fansub groups add such reminders that could be interpreted as "we did not intend to infringe any rights" if they get sued. So if some shady guy tries to sell some dvds, and ...


3

As I mentioned in my answer over at How is an anime based on western-literature made? Usually if somebody wishes to obtain said rights, they would hire a lawyer, as obtaining the rights, setting the terms and options, and the costs that come with it are surrounded by a lot of legal rump slump But this depends quite a bit on what your 'end goal' is. I ...


1

One of the ways to do it will be by asking the owner of the copyright of the anime Boruto: Naruto Next Generations which is “d-rights Inc”. You can find that by searching up on google, “Who owns the copyright of Boruto: Naruto Next Generations”. You can search up other anime copyright owners to ask them, but take note that sometimes when you want to use ...


1

For legal questions such as these, it is always good to contact a copyright lawyer in your country. Laws regarding fair use, copyrights and the likes differ per country, and a copyright lawyer should be more than capable of answering your questions. And this answer should not be seen as legal advice. As Turamarth points out in the comments, the cover image ...


1

I think this is largely to do with Copyright issues. You see those who distribute or offer the file are usually in the wrong and violate Japanese copyright laws. But because copyright highly relies on where you are in the world (speaking geographically) fan operated groups who do these fansubs often get away from this and find a way to "turn the other corner"...


1

Take a look at this article at Anime News Network entitle "The Law of Anime", it mentions copyrights on characters: Fanart and doujinshi of actual characters can be considered a derivative work under the copyright holders’ rights. As a result, the production of artwork using copyrighted characters can be considered an infringement. This includes ...


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