Hot answers tagged

3

For the most part, there is not much. The author Isuna Hasekura herself mentioned in an interview that Holo is based off folklore from France, Germany, and Slavonic countries. One particular story worth noting is that of the "corn-wolf" from the story of the Golden Bough. That and a particular mention of a corn ritual parallels particular Pasloe rituals ...


3

That's a box cutter, more commonly known as a utility knife. I'm unsure exactly how common they are in Japanese schools, but they're certainly not prohibited: off the top of my head, Charlotte and Grisaia no Kajitsu are two other anime that depict box cutter-wielding schoolgirls (albeit in more sinister contexts). In real-world Japan, there was an infamous ...


2

It means "abracadabra" essentially. It's a spell they recite in maid cafes when they serve food to customers in order to "make it taste better." Kind of like abracadabra, it doesn't really mean anything as a phrase or do anything physically to the food, but it signifies an incantation and is part of the ritual and attention giving aspects of maid cafes. -...


2

According to this official translation "padoru" means "wading". Dashing through the snow, in a one horse open sleigh, together we wade through, Tsukimihara U.!


1

Schools and teachers of Japan in particular tend to be more involved in the lives of their students than in the West. The reasons may vary, as each school sets their own policies. The main philosophy behind such policies is that students should be more focused on school (and extracurriculars). Their reasoning is that working it distracts from time they ...


1

In Japanese sign language, two of those hand symbols touching together at the tips of the fox's "nose" means "kiss" for people or in general. However, in this case they seem to be playing around, like you would with bunny ear gestures, as another comment mentions. Edit: Here is a video of the "kiss" sign in Japanese sign language. I couldn't link the page ...


1

This all probably bogs down to Nero's whimsical nature and "padoru" is just some mumble jumbo that took on a life of its own as a meme. As some may not be aware the Saber-class servant Nero Claudius is a bad, off-key singer, much like the Lancer-class Elisabeth Bathory. Nero herself has no particular skills or feats that would qualify her to be a Saber ...


1

There is no direct correspondence in Shinto, which doesn't have a god or harbinger/herald of spring (except for the sakura tree), although in some stories a rooster is said to have tempted Amaterasu the sun goddess out of her cave - to end winter. The mask is a stylized owl, though. In older legends, owls are bringers of luck/warders against misfortune. ...


1

I love the sophistication of the question, and it so happens that I was musing about this too. So, as a non-Japanese speaker, I did the obvious, and entered the Japanese characters for the Harbinger of Spring into Google search and got a wikipedia entry ... about the anime. Then used Google translate to get some sense of the Harbinger character. What I ...


1

Horokew (Kamuy) is the Ainu word for wolf. And probably where Horo's name comes from. The r is important because unlike the Japanese language the Ainu language actually has the R-sound. Inserting it this way will help you find more background on Ainu tradition and wolf deities that in part inspired the Horo you know and love from Spice & Wolf.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible