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5

I think you might have landed in a category of Isekai novels where Medieval influence is more prevalent. As a avid reader of Isekai's myself, I can confirm that there are also plenty of Isekai's available that do not draw from the medieval ages, but focus more on other eras or even on far more futuristic worlds. However, as you validly point out, medieval ...


4

The proverb is real, although spoken differently. In episode 5 of Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple, Miu said the following proverb, 男子門口を出れば七人の敵あり (danshi kadoguchi wo dereba shichinin no teki ari) A young man, if he steps out of the gateway, there are seven enemies (lit.) The more known proverbs are: 男は敷居を跨げば七人の敵あり (otoko wa shiki'i wo matageba shichinin ...


3

Several variants of this proverb can be found on multiple sites but no direct origin is given: "Once outside the gate, a man has seven enemies." (source) "Seven enemies await outside every man’s gate" (source) "As soon as a man leaves his house he has seven enemies." (source) The only explanation of the meaning that I found ...


3

That's a box cutter, more commonly known as a utility knife. I'm unsure exactly how common they are in Japanese schools, but they're certainly not prohibited: off the top of my head, Charlotte and Grisaia no Kajitsu are two other anime that depict box cutter-wielding schoolgirls (albeit in more sinister contexts). In real-world Japan, there was an infamous ...


2

In Japanese sign language, two of those hand symbols touching together at the tips of the fox's "nose" means "kiss" for people or in general. However, in this case they seem to be playing around, like you would with bunny ear gestures, as another comment mentions. Edit: Here is a video of the "kiss" sign in Japanese sign language. I couldn't link the page ...


1

Schools and teachers of Japan in particular tend to be more involved in the lives of their students than in the West. The reasons may vary, as each school sets their own policies. The main philosophy behind such policies is that students should be more focused on school (and extracurriculars). Their reasoning is that working it distracts from time they ...


1

"A normal zip or cable tie is borrowed. A participant firmly cables the performers two thumbs together, making it impossible for the performer's hands to separate" (wonderwizards.com). So my understanding is that by pinning the thumbs together, separating the hands becomes impossible and thus, minimal hand movements restrict leverage to pull on the ...


1

There is no direct correspondence in Shinto, which doesn't have a god or harbinger/herald of spring (except for the sakura tree), although in some stories a rooster is said to have tempted Amaterasu the sun goddess out of her cave - to end winter. The mask is a stylized owl, though. In older legends, owls are bringers of luck/warders against misfortune. ...


1

I love the sophistication of the question, and it so happens that I was musing about this too. So, as a non-Japanese speaker, I did the obvious, and entered the Japanese characters for the Harbinger of Spring into Google search and got a wikipedia entry ... about the anime. Then used Google translate to get some sense of the Harbinger character. What I ...


1

Another reason gap moe is used is because it allows the reader/viewer to see the character as more than just a one dimensional figure, as in reality it is entirely possible for people to be caught off guard by people who act differently than expected. The contradiction, when handled properly, makes perfect sense as the story progresses because while it does ...


1

I'm Japanese. Even in Japanese schools, uniform designs are not always divided by grade. Certainly, some real schools in Japan may have different design of gym clothes (For examole, colors of the jersey or headband) or some part of uniforms (For examole, color of Ties or Scarves.) depending on the year of enrollment. This is so that the grade can be visually ...


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