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Doujinshi is closer to what we think of as "indie/self-published" comics compared to manga. Professionals can produce doujinshi as well as amateurs, and many mangaka will produce doujinshi on the side when they're otherwise unable to produce a certain work for legal reasons. Doujinshi are often, but not limited to: Fanart of pre-existing intellectual ...


12

If by "doujinshi" you mean "self-published manga that parody other published works" (probably the most restrictive definition), the answer is yes. Examples: Nyoron Churuya-san (a Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuuutsu doujin) If you loosen the definition to "self-published manga", there are even more examples: Sore ga Seiyuu! Getsuyoubi no Tawawa If you go further ...


11

TLDR; Doujin: Fandom created works Doujinshi: a (Broader)category of Doujin Doujinshika: A very, very limited form of Doujinka Doujinka: A Doujin creator Now In more details A Doujin A Doujin, actually stands for a group of people that stand to achieve something, or share the same interests/hobbies. However, it also depicts the work they make. Which in ...


11

What kind of drawing format is this? It's a "Circle Cut". In this context, "Circle" means "Doujinshi circle", and "Cut" means "Cut-out". It's exclusively used in a doujinshi market place such as Comiket, Comitia, etc to be used in the catalog. The format is: A little box on the upper-left: Indexing/Stall location (to be explained later) Text inside the ...


10

The term Doujinshi is rather broad, encompassing any self-published work. Sometimes, although rarely, even big name authors have created some doujinshi. Wikipedia has a pretty decent article which defines it as: Dōjinshi (同人誌{どうじんし}), often transliterated as doujinshi) is the Japanese term for self-published works, usually magazines, manga or novels. ...


9

Well, if it's self published, it is called doujinshi. If it's by a manga publisher, it's manga. Note that this distinction makes no mention of relative quality...simply who is doing the publishing (and presumably paying for) the work. Wikipedia highlights this in the first paragraph: Dōjinshi (同人誌?, often transliterated as doujinshi) is the Japanese ...


7

Both Comiket and COMITIA are doujinshi conventions held in Japan. Both conventions are generally the same event with several differences. See What events usually happen at Comiket? Main Focus While both Comiket's and COMITIA's main focus is socializing and exchange doujinshi. COMITIA is the largest dojinshi convention focused completely for the exchange of ...


6

To understand the Japanese law, you need to learn the idea of "Antragsdelikt" (親告罪, shinkokuzai). This means if copyright holder doesn't complain about the doujinshi, it's not illegal. Most publishers in Japan don't prohibit doujinshi (at least explicitly), thus it's not illegal. It's because many commercial manga authors also create doujinshi, and ...


6

Doujinshi just means you published it yourself, so the difference is that non-doujinshi manga is published by a company, while doujinshi manga is a self-published manga


5

The first one is the dominant one a.k.a. seme while the second one is the receiver a.k.a. uke. For example in doujinshi Puella Magi Madoka Magica Doujinshi Homura x Madoka (available online in online manga sites), Homura will be the seme, while Madoka is the uke.


3

There is a small amount of officially-released statistical data in English here. The "History of Comic Market" section of the "What is Comic Market" PDF shows a chronology chart of the number of participating circles (32 in the first Comiket, up to 550,000 in a recent Comiket), and the following pages of the PDF list more specifics. In terms of volumes of ...


3

Ka in Dojinshi-ka have two corresponding Japanese. I'm not sure which one you talk. I want to describe literal meaning. Doujin(同人) : 同=same 人=person, so 同人mean people/group who have same interest. originally used for group of writing poet, painting area. but now almost only used for subculture area include A&M. Doujin-shi(同人誌) : 誌=magazine. so dojin-shi ...


2

Yes. Example: Yoshitoshi Abe's, Haibane Renmei.


1

Take a look at this article at Anime News Network entitle "The Law of Anime", it mentions copyrights on characters: Fanart and doujinshi of actual characters can be considered a derivative work under the copyright holders’ rights. As a result, the production of artwork using copyrighted characters can be considered an infringement. This includes ...


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