5

It's "run rabbit junk" by Yoko Kanno from the first OST. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXSgnsnu8ro


5

Personally, I think the following chronological timeline works best for story purposes and character arcs, but only if you ignore a few specific points, such as the dates specified in the films. To me, it makes more sense as: Ghost In The Shell: Arise Ghost In The Shell (original or 2.0) Ghost In The Shell: SAC - The Laughing Man Ghost In The Shell: SAC, ...


5

I will move this to comment, when I'm able. Notice the [mouse] cursor being moved to the "purchase" button. This is clearly an individual and not software. The user also scrolls through the list to find the Cerano entry where software would index and select the entry directly from an array or list in memory and not with the mouse.


4

They're the Major's friends/friends-with-benefits. (She actually does have a life outside work.) The one with darker hair is named Ran; the one with lighter hair is Kurutan. She isn't a maid bot, she's just wearing a frilly dress and getting Motoko drinks, well, 'cause... (By the way, I think it's actually Kurutan's apartment -- the Major was borrowing her ...


4

He's got a "walkie-talkie" in his brain. I'm not sure, but I suspect his brain is fully cyberized as part of his job's requirements. You would certainly not want to be that one idiot shouting tactical information out loud while the rest are communicating almost instantly via a secured wireless connection. In the GITS:SAC series when he's in court, his ...


4

I'm not sure it is explicit in the show, but here is my long-winded explanation based on extrapolating from present-day technologies and trends: Today, "certificates" are used to verify the identity of (trust) computers you communicate with; a website that looks like your bank's, isn't your bank's. By installing/using your OS, you've already consented to ...


3

(Upon review I've determined that the source provided is insufficient to support my answer. I'm currently investigating sources to come up with a more appropriate answer.) Her body is a mass production "pleasure model" so that she blends into (I assume 'shady') environments in the city. That's why she wears sexy clothes so often, to fit her cover. Source: ...


3

In episode 24 it is heavily implied that Section 9 (not the members) is formed by the Prime Minister himself and Section 9 (i.e Aramaki) only reports to or takes order from either the Home Minister Affairs or directly from the Prime Minister himself. This is why Aramaki is immediately called in by the Home Affairs Minister to meet at the Prime Ministers ...


3

Watch the original movie first. Arise if you are young and need backstory and canonical chronological OCD. S.A.C is really great and if someone was on a time budget, watching this alone would justify the series and world that truly exposes corruption, future technology and potential criminal activity along with deep socio-political introspective. If you like ...


3

I found a page that lists Blu-Ray sets you can buy for SAC, and those contain audio commentaries. That indicates that there are audio commentaries, but I'm not sure if they can be gotten not on the Blu-Ray set. As far as I can tell, there is no audio commentary for Arise, but considering that it hasn't been released on any sort of disc form, that might ...


2

This was a comment first, but converted to an answer. The hole idea is called Simulacra and was investigated by Jean Baudrillard. The original inspiration was Salingers short story "The laughing Man". The concept is now also known as "Stand Alone Complex", but it's not frequently used, except (for example) for the group Anonymous. Also, this question may ...


2

She said 「な・あ・に」 (na-a-ni, "What"). In Japan, there's a TV program on BS2 channel called BSアニメ夜話 (BS Anime Night Talks), and on 26 February 2009, it's talking about Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex. Regarding that scene, the original storyboard revealed that she was supposed to say "na-a-ni". With cold expression, Major Kusanagi didn't convey ...


2

In addition to Hakase's answer, Togusa's character has something in common between all series/movies and continuities: he is the less cyberized person in Section 9. In the original movie from 1995, Major Kusanagi says something along the lines of: We hired you because you are not a full cyborg, super specialization would make us weaker. They also ...


2

Secretary General Yakushima would have feelers out to pick up on any operation like the one Section 9 were pulling off. The universe also doesn't set up the enemies as inert - they are active and have skills - at that level of espionage, the Secretary General would totally have the resources to uncover what Section 9 was doing. Interestingly, one of the ...


1

As stated from this subreddit, the complete box set should include (in chronological order): Ghost in the Shell (1995) Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex 2nd Gig Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex - Solid State Society Ghost in the Shell: Arise - Border 1: Ghost Pain Ghost in ...


1

In the very next scene, major Kusanagi explains: The risks, of course, are considerable, but we couldn't find a better solution than to further edit Yu's memories with a successful assassination attempt. So what we see after the moment major attached a cyberbrain-disabling device to the back of his neck, is only a fake memory.


1

As the name suggests, a bioroid is an android, but built with human body parts-- except that they don't have a human brain. The Major is a cyberized human, and an android is the least human of the three.


1

The episode starts with the words of a correspondent: "Marcelo Jarti, leader of the Jenoma democratic revolution, as well as military advisor to the current administration, was attacked in Panan City today". He was visiting and the shooting was pretty serious, so he was assumed to have been killed. Section 9's agents are seen confirming his identity in the ...


1

It seems that the prime minister had acquired a modest amount of military backing and/or created task forces that the governing body (and section 9) were unaware of. Similar to the clone army in Star Wars, Sifo-Dyas believed he had commissioned the secret army "for the Republic" to be held in reserve for the coming conflict. Neither the ruling party nor the ...


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