15

Most likely the last arc of the show was originally planned to adapt The Disappearance of Suzumiya Haruhi, but the producers changed their mind well into production, and decided to make it into a movie instead. As a result they had to fill in a seven episodes gap that they already bought the timeslot for, thus this gimmick was born. They Endless Eight ...


13

No, we don't. From quick googling, it seems that it has not been revealed yet, even in the light novel. But it seems some hints exist. From "Kyon" on Wikipedia: The name Kyon is actually a nickname given to him; his real name has yet to be revealed in the series. His sister is responsible for spreading its use amongst his schoolmates, much to his ...


9

Officially, Season 2 is a sequel to Season 1; it was released after Season 1 and doesn't repeat any material. The US DVD releases for the two are completely separate. But because of the jumbled continuity of the Haruhi Suzumiya series, the Japanese TV broadcast of Season 2 included a rebroadcast of Season 1. That's why when you looked it up, your source said ...


9

The show's existence is in itself a spoiler for The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, so anyone who hasn't seen the movie/read the book yet has been warned. Yuki-chan is a spinoff anime based on a manga that began in 2009. The series is written by the original author of the Haruhi series, Nagaru Tanigawa, and takes place in the alternate universe created ...


8

The terms "shounen" and "seinen" are assigned to a work for many reasons, none of them really having to do with how intellectual or difficult the work is. The most common criteria are the age group and gender that a work is aimed at and the magazine in which a work is published (for manga and light novels), but the definitions for these terms are fuzzy ...


6

tl;dr - They share what literary types call "themes". Angel Beats and Haruhi are both "school anime", so they will more than likely share themes. School anime is a theme, the "school club" and "strong female lead" are also themes. You will find these themes in many anime as you watch more of them. Another example of a "school anime" with a "strong female ...


5

According to RomajiDesu, it's a species of barking deer. It's humorous because the "n" on the end makes it sound feminine. Onii-chan is a token of respectful affection, in contrast. It's the contrast from being called (in all sincerity) "dearest big brother" and "Bambi"


5

As described in Wikipedia, Haruhi possesses unconscious god-like abilities to change, destroy, and reshape reality to her desires. In an interview, Tanigawa stated that the idea for the character came during a sleepless night at the beginning of the 21st century. I think Koizumi also mentioned that Haruhi has a God-like power. I just don't remember what ...


5

The characters seem to do "the same things over and over again" because they are trapped in what TV-Tropes call a "Groundhog Day" loop. The Wikipedia article on time loops explains it very short and crisp: Stories with time loops commonly center on correcting past mistakes or on getting a character to recognize some key truth; escape from the loop may ...


4

In the light Novel at least: Of course, note that this is just speculation too, as the Light Novel has a first person perspective (so we don't actually read about Koizumi seeing the mole, so therefore the above also won't be read about). However, it's quite likely that KyoAnim added it because of this case. The scene can be found in: Later on...


4

I don't have any hard evidence to back it up, but I always assumed that it was at that point that Koizumi actually started taking Kyon seriously. Instead of just looking at what he seems to be at first glance, he started peering into him at greater depth. And, since it's mostly a comedy series, that greater depth involves a mole.


4

No one knows why director did it or what purpose it served. In the novels themselves, only last "loop" was recorded and the whole thing spanned not even 100 pages. If I were to speculate, then only reason why they did what they did was because number of coincidences during airing of the episodes were so high it was too good to pass on the opportunity. Also, ...


4

I believe that Haruhi and Kyon are interlinked through the universe. The light novels, manga, anime and movie all strongly suggest that one cannot live without the other. In order for any world to exist, they must be together. I speculate that the feelings he experiences with Mikuru is purely physical. He's a 14-15 year old boy and he's in front of a big-...


3

From a writer's standpoint, showing the episodes in the order in which they originally aired was almost certainly a move to improve the flow of the story. If you read the books, although the idea behind Vol. 1 is fascinating, it's mostly the protagonist talking to various characters who explain the situation to him, and there's only one real action scene (or ...


3

The continuity is very slightly more clear in the novels. Episode 0 is the movie that the SOS Brigade films to show at the school festival during "Live Alive". In the novels, the Brigade makes the movie during The Sigh of Haruhi Suzumiya, the second novel in the series, which is adapted to anime in the last four episodes of Series 2. The novels The ...


2

Episode 0 is technically the last episode in the season. The chronological order of the episodes can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Melancholy_of_Haruhi_Suzumiya_episodes Under the E tab, you can order it by descending or ascending. Using Crunchyroll's ordering, episode 2 should be the first episode to watch.


2

You're not meant to "know" what Haruhi's power is, but instead you're meant to draw your own conclusion about what Haruhi "is"; which is one of greatest charms of this show. Koizumi, Mikuru, and Yuki all have different conflicting views on Haruhi, and the viewer is meant to have one of their own; whether they can draw their own original view on Haruhi or ...


2



1

Rather than an in-joke, I saw this more as Kyon making a connection to the common phenomenon of television networks censor bleeping out inappropriate words, most commonly with that 1000 Hz tone sound. Television programs can also use euphemisms to censor content—for example, in the Breaking Bad episode of Mythbusters, they used "special sauce" to refer to a ...


1

"Kyon" doesn't actually have an independent meaning in Japanese (unless it's a rather obscure sound effect); it's just a silly nickname he got saddled with by his aunt and little sister, and although Kyon consistently says that he hates it, his real name is never revealed in the books. (I've read all of them, and was actively looking for information related ...


1

The only character which can be considered an actual Slider (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interdimensional_being), albeit temporarily, is Kyon. He was the only character (an actual person, rather than a temporal construct made by Haruhi as Yasumi was) who experienced first hand existing in two different dimensions during the events of the 4th novel(the ...


1

All we KNOW about his name is that it's majestic/noble. As stated before, Sasaki, someone who knew Kyon before, stated this, but still referred to him as Kyon. As well, based off what was said before, his last name could start with "Sa," or "Shi," assuming the second mora of his family name is after "Ka" so that he is seated behind Sakanaka Yoshimi. Based ...


1

Okay, there are a lot of theories regarding this topic. I guess there truth is, the couple you support, you are determined to find parts in the movie that hints that they like each other. Even if it doesn't generally mean that, you interpret it to be and bend your mind to find reasons. In the end, it's just an anime however lol, I'm still dying to find out ...


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