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What is a light novel? A light novel is a style of Japanese novel targeting teenagers and young adults. These novels contain mostly illustrations in anime or manga style. They are usually published in bunkobon size (A6 – 105 x 148mm). Light novels are not very long. The length is comparable to a novella in US publishing terms. Light novels are very popular ...


28

It makes absolutely no sense for a book consisting of just English text to have its pages ordered such that you read the page on the right followed by the page on the left. So of course people don't publish English translations of light novels that way. However, it makes some sense for a book consisting of English text superimposed on images to be read ...


13

When referring to a novel, you'd be talking about... A fictitious prose narrative of book length, typically representing character and action with some degree of realism. Therefore I always assumed a light novel to be a short story of sorts, something you could read on the bus or on the train. After looking it up, I was wrong. A light novel apparently is ...


9

These are just the different cover release versions. At one point, Yen Press was printing these with a slipcover case on them that shows a more "appealing cover" for the Americanized audience. However, not everyone liked this. They're not available anymore and were a limited print only, so the versions Amazon has listed are the normal and slip covered ...


9

Is this term only used in Japan? This term originated in Japan as a 和製英語 (wasei eigo [meaning Japan-style English] = Japanese-invented words that "superficially appear to come from English, but in fact do not"). Wasei eigo differs from 外来語 (gairaigo = loanwords or real “words from abroad”) and Engrish (misuse or accidental corruption of the English language ...


6

Light Novels are indeed harder to translate, but that isn't the real cause for their delay. The market for LN is really small outside Japan for a number of reasons so companies aren't interested in publishing them unless they are for very famous franchises (like Haruhi), and even then it's very risky. As I said, translations and edition arent the reason per ...


6

I wouldn't say that it's common, but it does happen. Here are some examples: Musaigen no Phantom World had a PV in Jan 2014, which preceded the announcement of its anime in Aug 2015. Likewise, Kyoukai no Kanata had a PV some time in 2012, prior to the announcement of its anime in Apr 2013. I think the same thing happened with Free! / High Speed!. However, ...


6

The Anime Man explains this in his video. TL;DR: People get lazy to read the blurb of the novel (the short summary usually at the back of the book) to know what it's about, so a longer title will be more descriptive than titles like "Wish". The LN industry is getting bigger, therefore everyone will eventually run out of titles to use (even movies there are ...


4

Mainly the illustrator does. Basically writers are not involved in design. But he or she can tell the hope to the editor. It is an example of making a light novel. An author write up the novel. The author passes it to the editor. (Perhaps they will talk about what the author wishes at this time, like illustrator desired by the author, places of ...


3

According to the Japanese Wikipedia, for the earliest light novels, artists were selected by the publishing company EITHER for their work in 油絵 (abura-e = oil painting) and 水彩画 (suisaiga = watercolor) OR for their work in manga-style art, such as PC games. In 1987, the 少女文学 (shoujo bungaku = girl's literature) or 少女小説 (shoujo shosetsu = girl's novels) genre ...


3

Is this term only use in Japan? It originated in Japan but not exclusive of Japan. There are light novel writers in Korea and China, since it can be used for anything written within certain criteria. How is light novel different from regular novel? If I had to describe it in few words: a easier to read novel. If you check out some novels, like ...


3

Why is this style of title so common? How did this trend of super long titles come about? From what I was able to research, light novels and/or manga have long title: Because it helps the light novel/manga stand out Due to the competition in the industry, authors have to find ways to grab the interest of readers. One such way that has become popular is ...


3

(speculation, but I think of the common sense sort) When standing in a bookstore crowded with light novels, what is the main thing a prospective buyer wants to know? "What is it about?" They are scanning through dozens if not hundreds of titles. Two things are available to quickly help the buyer know what each book might be about. cover (and back cover) ...


3

The Haruhi Suzumiya series is mainly set in Nishinomiya, Japan. The Oreimo series is mainly set in Chiba, Japan. It's quite obvious by the mentions in the Oregairu series novel and various episodes that the main setting of the series is based in Chiba, Japan as well. Each author has their own reason for explicitly stating, excluding, or obscuring the main ...


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You should probably go in the order in which they were released, as Arcane also mentioned. But otherwise, an ideal order would be as follows: Owari no Chronicle Owari no Chronicle DC Kyoukai Senjou no Horizon Kyoukai Senjou no Horizon Kimitoasamade Gekitotsu no Hexennacht City Series Note that Owari no Chronicle, despite being several thousand years ...


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The novels do not have a official English translation.


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I'm not an industry insider but it's not a deliberate matter of testing the market with manga before doing an anime. It's simply that an anime is a much larger investment for all parties involved with a much longer lead time. As a result, the chances are, by the time a LN has passed through the various investors and producers required to greenlight it it ...


1

After a decent amount of research, I have to retract my previous answer. There are in fact a lot of series that started as Light Novels and achieved commercialized success. Some include Accel World, Zero no Tsukaima, Haruhi Suzumiya, and Shakugan no Shana. Their order of progression was LN -> Manga -> Anime. Then there are still LN today that have a manga, ...


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As of now, yes! Some Visual Novels (these count as novels in my book) have been successfully crowd funded out here. A few examples of that are mostly done by the Sekai Project. For example, World End Economica was already funded and has been translated and released. The original KickStarter can be found here. Sekai Project is working on a few others, too. ...


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