15

The romanized title is not meant to be an English translation at all. It is not half Latin + half English; it is all Latin from start to finish: Puella Magi Madoka Magica. So we shouldn't read the "Madoka Magica" as if it were English and then wonder at why "Puella Magi" is not English. "Madoka" is the main character's name (鹿目 まどか), so that word is a native ...


13

Those chairs are a direct reference to Bokurano, understanding which actually adds depth to the scene (if you've seen Bokurano). Bokurano huge spoilers:


13

the crests in the background are giving it away from left to right: 1: Gisela 2: Elly 3: Charlotte 4: Gertrud 5: Elsa Maria


12

Madoka Magica (art by hanokage; story by Magica Quartet1) is an almost shot-for-shot manga adaptation of the anime. There are a couple minor differences (e.g. it's made more explicit that Sayaka kills the two guys on the train just before she turns into a witch; Kyuubey does these freaky open-mouthed smiles), but other than those, it's pretty much the same ...


12

This is a question for Gen Urobuchi (Puella Magi Madoka Magica writer) at a Nitro+ Q&A Panel Q: Did Homura get her weapon from Madoka?


11

So, after a while of researching this, it appears that someone had taken a subtitle file and run it through Gizoogle's Translation site. Gizoogle is a parody of Google based off of Snoop Dogg's lingo What this does is translates sentences such as: Madoka and Homura are best witch friends forever. into Gangsta slang: Madoka n' Homura is dopest ...


11

Perhaps by letting them know that in Japan, Puella Magi Madoka Magica is a late night anime, not a children's anime? Children's anime in Japan is an anime that caters to audience from baby up to middle schooler. Examples are Pretty Cure series (and most of magical girl anime), Doraemon, Hello Kitty, and Pokèmon. The screening times are either morning (...


10

According to Gen Urobuchi from his interview in Otona Anime Vol. 20: The weapon that looks like Homura's shield is actually a sand timer. When the flow of the sand is blocked, time is stopped. And when there is no sand on the upper part of the sand timer and then the timer is reverted, one month's worth of time is turned back. But before that stage is ...


10

It's been confirmed by multiple sources (from the movie and game) that it says: HOMU LILLY HOMULILLY Which matches up with the PSP game:


10

Witches are not needed for the Incubators. Witches are needed for the survival of the magical girls. The Incubators could not care less about what happens to the magical girls as long as there are enough girls to turn into Puella Magis. The sole purpose of the Incubators making Puella Magis is to generate energy. There would be no need to have witches. Of ...


10

She wished the cat in the opening (named Amy) to be saved from being run over by a car. This is revealed in the Drama CD 1. More info about wishes in the series: https://wiki.puella-magi.net/Wish_theories#.E2.9C.94.C2.A0Timeline_1_-_Save_that_cat.21 More info about the Drama CD 1: https://wiki.puella-magi.net/Drama_CD_1


9

When a magical girl falls into despair, her soul gem turns into a grief seed, which makes her a witch. Sounds about right. Fun times all round! Good old 'Dokes. What does "projections of the magical girl's heart" mean? Madoka is quite meta in it's Magic sometimes. Consider Wishes, which just break all laws ever, by Kyuubey's word. The exact mechanics ...


9

Each girl has a different situation. Girls' ages are around 13…16 years old, and they are still in school, so it's natural for them to be living with their parents. We don't know if students from all walks of life are able to attend the kind of school the girls go to, so we'll have to work with other info. Madoka and Sayaka live with their parents in ...


8

It turns out that the runes in this segment actually represent romaji (transliterated Japanese), rather than German (which is more commonly the language represented by the runes). Jon Lin's comment links to a Japanese blogpost that has done the gruntwork of converting from runes to Japanese.3 I trust they're right; I only double-checked the first few lines ...


8

Ok, let me try to answer this the best I can. I've watched the movie twice: in a theatre in Paris and the subbed camrip that's been going around. although Madoka wish in the second movie, which prevented the birth of any witch, both in the past and in the future. Why then Homura becomes a Witch? Madoka's wish wasn't exactly that. She wished to erase all ...


8

There is no information about who it was that became Walpurgisnacht. All we really know is that Walpurgisnacht is, in some sense, a fusion of multiple witches (or magical girls, I guess). Official description from July 2011 Megami interview with Urobuchi: In the last episode we saw the "Walpurgisnacht", but what kind of witch is it specifically? ...


8

Episode 7 paints the picture of Kyouko's background. Basically, Kyouko is all alone having lost everyone important to her including her family. So she's in despair and desperate to find comfort somewhere. After hearing Sayaka's story, Kyouko started to identify with her. So they effectively formed a friendship. Episode 10 reveals that this friendship is ...


8

From the wiki page this should be the part: As Homura realizes that said witch must be no other than herself, Kyubey appears and reveals that she had fallen into despair and when she was about to become a witch, he and the other incubators isolated her soul gem to set a trap for Madoka, in order to take control of her power. However, when Madoka appeared, ...


8

When Kyoko overloaded her soul gem to kill Sayaka's witch form, does Kyoko then also become a witch? Or since she overloaded her soul gem, does she just die "normally?" Kyouko didn't become a witch, since she died in battle, rather than suffering a blackening of her Soul Gem. If the latter is true, then why don't all magical girls just overload their ...


7

There are, definitionally, no witches in the post-Madoka universe. As such, it is not possible that Kyouko fought Sayaka's witch. Besides, Mami says: 行ってしまったわ。円環の理に導かれて。 ミキさん、さっきのあの一撃にすべての力を使ってしまったのね。 She's gone. Taken away by the Law of Cycles. Miki used up all her energy in that last attack, didn't she? And furthermore, we see that they have just set a ...


7

There aren't any substantive connections between the two series, in terms of content. From a production perspective, though, there is a lot of overlap between them. First, as you noted, they're both produced by Shaft, which means they share a lot of staff, most notable among them director SHINBO Akiyuki, whose directorial flourishes are easily seen in both ...


7

The text on the wall are references to Faust, which foreshadows the plot for the anime. Original Text: Weh! Weh! Du hast sie zerstört, Die schöne Welt, Mit mächtiger Faust; Sie stürzt, sie zerfällt! Ein Halbgott hat sie zerschlagen! Wir tragen Die Trümmern ins Nichts hinüber, Und klagen Über die verlorne Schöne. Mächtiger Der Erdensöhne, Prächtiger Baue ...


7

Nothing, the end result has always been Magical Girls becoming witches regardless if they fight or not. When a Magical Girl is made, their Soul is removed from their body and made/placed into the Soul Gem. As they use their magic, the Soul Gem clouds in which they need Grief Seed to purify. If it's not purified, it will become a Grief Seed and the Magical ...


7

This is because the date in which Homura returns to is actually before Madoka contracts with Kyubey Looking at the Timelines Wiki page we see that it's estimated that Madoka makes the contract a couple of days after Homura would wake up in the hospital. while the wiki page says that the dates shouldn't be taken as canon we can make the assumption that this ...


6

It could be assumed that every wish is possible, yet Kyubey may lie about a wish being possible since granting a wish will also drain the universe of energy. Kyubey will most likely only grant a wish if the energy outputted from a Magical Girl becoming a Witch is greater than what was needed to grant the wish, indicated when Kyubey sometimes says something ...


6

Mami could entrap Homura with her ribbon at any time, but decided to play fair and square during the duel − she didn't use the ribbon to her advantage. The whole gun duel was Mami's way to show that Homura can't beat her and do whatever Mami thought Homura was planning to do. When Homura stops time after throwing away her gun, Mami's face changes from ...


6

I can only think that the bullet didn't actually hit her head, but only scratch her. She point the gun on her head not to kill her self, but to distract Mami. Mami, who is Homura's friend, didn't want Homura to die, tried to save her. She pull the ribbon when Homura shot her gun and this makes her miss the shot. I believe she did it on purpose, because after ...


6

By interview of Gen Urobuchi, Law of Wheels/Cycles is a folklore talked between Magical Girls. Following idea is my (and some Japanese anime fan's) guess. Law of Wheels/Cycles is translated from "円環の理". 理 is principle or reasonable. I think 円環 is circle or ring instead of Wheels/Cycle. Madoka is officially written as "まどか", but most Japanese have a name ...


6

So, uh, this is kind of weird. According to a guy on Chiebukuro (which is basically Japanese Yahoo! Answers), the artist of this end card, HIKAWA Hekiru, is a fan of the movie Mad Max 2, and one of the characters in that movie is a dude named Humungus, who is the guy pictured here. Also according to the guy on Chiebukuro, Humungus has apparently popped ...


6

There are many other official artwork for the series. That is the cover of the DVD box set and like you said, the other image where Kyoko is not included is the cover for the first volume of the manga. This is probably also the reason why Netflix used that artwork as its listing. I think iconic is subjective in this case. Someone more familiar with the ...


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