Hot answers tagged

15

This is very dependant per mangaka. And all tough there is a thriving independent market for manga, it is rarely a solo effort. Hence most of the mangaka start off as either an assistant, or manage to get a contract at a well known publisher. Now, as for how much they earn, lets take Eiichiro Oda as an example. He has been estimated to earn around 2 billion ...


12

Every artist has different drawing techniques. Some fully use the computer (using a drawing tablet and photoshop) Some fully draw by hand (using pencil, then pen, then erasing the pencil, the making the pen lined bolder) Some use a combination of the two (Draw by hand, scan to computer, complete with photoshop). It's really up to the artist.


12

To answer this question, we need to take in account the several factors that will decide how and how much they are paid: The number of pages drawn for each issues (20 pages or more). The regularity of his work (weekly, monthly...). The experience of the mangaka (newcomer, experienced...). The popularity of the mangaka's work (that 2002 manga you have never ...


11

Yes, it can. It is usually up to the publisher if they want to pursue continuing a series, depending on who owns the rights (family member tend to have a say in it as well). Note that for HotD, the plot creator was known to be a slow writer to begin with (2 years between vol. 6 and 7), and the manga was on hiatus for quite a while before his death (2011). ...


11

Business-wise, that is not very important because as long as these mangaka still sells, publishing companies would still like to sign a deal with them. To stop these kinds of mangaka from keep having jobs, then the market must reject their new project. Only then would a publishing company be unwilling to sign them. Now, most readers are just casual readers. ...


8

The short answer is no. Most manga readers you find out there are all third-party aggregators (therefore not licensed to distribute the manga in any form) that take fan made scanlations and host them on their respective sites. They make money from the ad revenue they receive from the traffic other sites. In other words, they take the hard work of others (...


8

As the answer in the previous question said, mangakas are ahead of 3-4 chapters though this figure may vary in some cases. The credible source for this is Eiichiro Oda, creator of One Piece manga, answers his fans questions at the SBS Corner, here's what he had said about this in particular: D: When an artist is drawing for example, Chapter 10, what ...


8

Hajime Isayama has mentioned a few times about ending the Attack on Titan series, but there's no official statement about ending it in 2018. One of the earliest was in 2013 when he discussed the series with another mangaka Hiroki Endo in November issue of a martial arts magazine Gong, he stated that the manga would end in 20 volumes. (Anime News Network) ...


7

Here's all the information you can find on the internet about Yoshihisa Tagami: Birthday: 09-12-1958 (DD-MM-YY) Source Hometown: Komoro, Nagano, Japan Source Born in 1958, Tagami first achieved manga success in the early 1980s with Karuizawa Syndrome for Big Comic Spirits. What followed was an extremely prolific decade, with nearly 20 titles released ...


7

In Japanese it's called Star system Earliest manga author who uses star system is Osamu Tezuka. See Wikipedia for details of his star system. Japanese version of wikipedia has a page for Star system of manga/anime Manga/anime section describe 3 categories. Clearly defined same name character. Osamu Tezuka, Fujiko Fujio, Shotaro Ishinomori, etc. Different ...


6

These are still just rumors and speculation. The most notable are in Death Note and Bakuman. In Death Note, the seminar Light goes to is called "Gamo Seminar": In Bakuman, there is reference to a series called Super Hero Legend. Not only is the concept similar, but even the drawings of this are very clear references to the art style of Hiroshi Gamo's 1993 ...


5

There are plenty of reasons why any figure would hide his identity. Manga is a big deal in Japan and thus many authors try to hide their identity, especially before they are popular. On a side note, I've heard that a lot of Japanese are uncomfortable being a public figure and want to keep their private life private. [citation needed] Some of the reasons ...


4

You're comparing apples with Ferraris here. Western comics as we consume them place more of an emphasis on the characters themselves as their selling point and charm, which is the chief reason that all three of the series you've mentioned have been told and retold time and again, and all exist in their own universes, with little to no bleed over. Manga as ...


4

I think none. First of all, in this link, these are the only manga examples created by authors who pretended to be the opposite sex using pen names. In the anime ef - a tale of memories, Hirono Hiro, 17 year-old male who is a professional mangaka, writes under the pen name Shindou Nagi, claiming to be female. Given that his work is shoujo, it's ...


4

It's definitely not something that just Hiro Mashima does; in fact, it's very common. Roel van Uden mentions Milk Morinaga in the comments. Sp0T mentions Ken Akamatsu. If you look back at Akamatsu's work, he almost always creates spiritual successors for his characters that have very similar appearances and personalities, e.g. AI Love You's Cindy became Love ...


4

There is a high likely hood that this is indeed a reference to Yoshihiro Togashi playing dragon quest. But it has never really been confirmed. It seems the original picture comes from CapsuleComputers with the following quote. After a long an arduous battle with addiction, Yoshihiro Togashi, the man behind the popular manga series Hunter x Hunter has ...


3

As you can see from these comments by me, @seijitsu, and @eha1234, there's a considerable amount of skepticism over how "recycled" these designs really are. Me: Personally, I don't think the characters in this question even look that similar, not compared to Ken Akamatsu's Naru and Asuna, or the Ai Yazawa and Naoko Takeuchi characters that seijitsu ...


3

The answer is trivially yes. I offer as evidence Himitsu no Akko-chan (quite a seminal work in its genre), which is written by AKATSUKA Fujio, who is by all appearances a man. People of all genders write all kinds of things. This should hardly come as a surprise.


2

Yes, it's possible but isn't easy... If the first mangaka is still alive. Then he/she needs to find someone willing to finish his/her manga, also the publisher needs to agree as well. Then it's possible. If the first mangaka is no longer alive. Then all the people who hold the rights to the manga (family, publishers) need to agree to let another mangaka ...


2

I can't imagine why the publishers would not allow that. Historically, it has been done by many writer circles − they publish their works under one pen-name, something the readers can remember easily than the actual names of several people involved. It's a good reason to use a pen-name and publishers generally don't protest if the artist want to use one.


2

Just to add up to @Madara's answer. Computers are also used to generate backgrounds. They'll generate wire mesh objects and room, if neccesary they'll apply complicated lighting and shadows (like sunlight passing through a complicated ceiling), apply textures to the models, and then print them and work by hand over them! You can see the process of an ...


2

It is common for an author to experiment with different genres, art, and media. But at the same time, it's also common that the same author uses different names for different demographics. You should distinguish between the writer and the pen name he/she uses, and between individual authors and groups. CLAMP is a collective and they're changing its ...


2

I'd say that the info on MAL's page would be the accurate one. You can see in Amazon's page for the first volume of Negima!? Neo, that both the information on the authors (right under the title) and the cover state that the story is by Akamatsu Ken and that Fujima Takuya is the illustrator. Also, Amazon.co.jp's page on Negima!?Neo too states Akamatsu ...


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