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25

As far as I can tell, it hasn't really spread back very much. However, my method of checking is a bit strange, so it's likely that a native Japanese speaker could answer this better. As you pointed out, the original version has 8000 rather than 9000. What Vegeta says in Japanese is "八千以上だ" which literally translates to "It's over 8000." I looked on nico ...


19

The name of this meme is Obi spin, from the Japanese term 帯回し obi-mawashi. An old jidaigeki-related meme wherein someone (usually a middle-aged man) pulls on the obi of a young woman wearing a kimono, causing her to spin around as it unravels. Usually accompanied by the tugger saying "It's fine, isn't it? (よいではないか、よいではないか)" in a sexually suggestive tone, ...


15

Etymology Etymologically speaking, the word takes its root from the Old English lǣwede : ignorant, unlearned. Then in the Middle English it got transformed into leud/lewed (found those two ways to write it): belonging to the common people, vulgar. It then derived into the mean worthless, vile, evil, leading to its current usage and connotations. Meaning ...


12

This is a meme in the English-speaking internet anime community. This particular phrasing appears to have come into existence around December 2013 (according to Google Trends), though variants are known to date back to 2012. It does not directly reference any particular work of anime or manga. Rather, it is inspired by a reasonably common trope of anime/...


11

In real-life Japanese culture, many people do hope to get and attempt to get the attention of their love interest without ever voicing it or being direct, so this is not an anime/manga-specific trope but rather works of anime/manga are incorporating a very standard experience of elementary/jr. high/high schoolers in Japan past and through to the present. In ...


11

When I first sat down to investigate "best girl", I was pretty sure that this was a fairly old lexical item - not pre-internet, by any means, but probably c. 2003-04. Alas, I had fallen victim to internet time dilation yet again. Having looked into it, I now claim that the idea of "best girl" as we now conceive of it only started to come into being quite a ...


11

So, after a while of researching this, it appears that someone had taken a subtitle file and run it through Gizoogle's Translation site. Gizoogle is a parody of Google based off of Snoop Dogg's lingo What this does is translates sentences such as: Madoka and Homura are best witch friends forever. into Gangsta slang: Madoka n' Homura is dopest ...


11

It certainly comes from the fans who have played the visual novel (VN) and set the expectation too high for the anime adaptation. Some background, the original Tsukihime VN was stated as an exceptionally big hit for a doujin game in Japan and drew big attention when an anime adaptation was decided. The VN itself also seemed to receive global recognition. ...


10

It has nothing to do with the fruit. They are derogatory versions of their associated words to make fun of the way they are mispronounced in English (with the "a" vs "ah" sound). Unfortunately, I don't have any references. Lurkmoar has a page dedicated to the anime/manga board on 4chan. EDIT: Just to clarify, I think people started using the "animu" and "...


10

Take note that the dance and a song are two parts of a whole. Most familiar with the the meme would know that the title is Swedish for "Caramel Dance" and comes from the first track of the album Supergott released in November 2001, by the Swedish band "Caramell." What's important about this is not the music but the animated dance that make up this meme. ...


9

Carameldansen on Know your meme Caramelldansen (eng. The Caramel Dance) is a series of animated dance videos that use the dance track with the same title. Its original track was released in Supergott which is the 2nd album of the Swedish pop group Caramell in November, 2001. The big sensation was caused on the web by the huge amount of fan-made ...


8

To be perfectly honest there was no original "notice me senpai" moment in anime. The way it started is when a female character has feelings for a guy, but she never manages to tell him, and this just happens again and again. My guess is that it was probably a fan of one of these anime that made the first meme. As for what anime was used in the first "notice ...


8

This is a rather famous scene from episode 37 of Death Note. Parodies of the scene have become fairly common, including a Know Your Meme page. For an example, this video has clips from the scene set to "Native Faith", the extra boss theme from Touhou 10. Misheard or altogether wrong lines from this scene are also common, as is the case in this particular GIF....


7

This is a reference Team Four Star's DragonBall Z Abridged series. In it, Picollo is teaching Gohan to dodge. However, he ends up conditioned to freeze in fear of the word instead. This becomes one of the most popular running gags in the series.


7

HamtaroWarrior's claims that it doesn't have much to do with anime and that "It just seems to be a way to translate "Itadakimsu"." [sic] miss the point. There is, in fact, a clear anime-related reason that "rub a dub dub, thanks for the grub" has become emblematic of over-localized translation: the abortive [gg] fansub of Toradora!! back in 2008 featured ...


7

'Best Girl' is usually used to refer to someone's favourite character in a series. For example, Toshinou Kyouko is best girl in Yuru Yuri. Generally, best girl is used to refer to a female character, but occasionally people include male characters. Take Shinji Ikari from Evangellion or Kaiki from the monogatari series. The term comes from fans choosing ...


7

The joke is to make fun of Americans saying 'animes and mangas' seeing as there are no pluralization for these words, other fans joke that they are saying animus and mangos. And this is what an animu/animus is: Noun: animus The basic impulses and instincts which govern one's actions. A feeling of enmity, animosity or ill will. (Jungian ...


7

Fangirls have been around for quite a while. The term having it's first recorded use in 1934 in the novel by humorist A. P. Herbert called Holy Deadlock which is about the struggles of a divorce. The first behavior which now a days is commonly described as Fangirl-moment or Fangirling is also used in this book, effectively making it the origin of the term. ...


5

Mango is a native fruit from the Philippines and is called Mangga in their language, which also has the same pronunciation of Manga (the Japanese comic book). So I think Filipinos started to call Manga as mangos (real plural spelling is mangoes), being it the plural of Mangga and it started to be viral in memes.


5

I think there's largely two reasons for these fights being so long and dragged out: There were points when the anime was being released faster than the manga was being published. This is a common issue in the anime industry. When this happens, the producing studio has two choices. They can either add in filler episodes (like DBZ did, also see Naruto), or ...


4

Some of the phrases are explained at the Steins;Gate wiki's Real-Life References and Glossary. Regarding the phrase「エル・プサイ・コングルゥ」(El Psy Congroo), according to Anime News Network, FutureGadgetLab is the anime's official Twitter account. According to a tweet by FutureGadgetLab, Okabe Rintarou (lab member #1) explains it as 「お前の胸の中にあるもの。それが答えだ。...


4

The full 28-minute version of Nice Boat is apparently available on Nicovideo (you'll need to make an account or use a redirector like nicoviewer). I didn't see the original Nice Boat back when it aired, so I can't say whether it's the real deal, but it certainly looks right to me. The Nice Boat itself makes its first appearance at 04:36. I would be ...


3

This originated from here. It's based on this meme, which itself is based on the manga Kuso Miso Technique, which was in the manga supplement of the gay magazine Barazoku in 1987. Scanned images of it began circulating the internet in 2002, and it became a meme after that.


3

Closest I could get to an answer. According to knowyourmeme: According to archived discussions[1] [2] from the Japanese imageboard site Futaba Channel (2chan), the photoshop meme originally began as a minor fad sometime in the summer of 2014, but it didn’t take off until the blank template image was posted on Twitter[4] by @Gorxxx_[3] on October 15th, ...


3

It comes from the Team Four star parody of Dragon-Ball, and it occurs during the part where Piccolo trains Gohan to fight the Sayans One of the things Piccolo does is tells Gohan to dodge, and then hits him. It's a running gag throughout the series. You can watch the parody at http://teamfourstar.com/


3

At about 21:00 in Season 2 Episode 20, there's the same scene: The plot: On the platform of the Sword of Akasha in the World of C, Charles zi Britannia is looking at the pillar-like object, telling the god that it's the time to finish everything. Lelouch then walks in saying that Charles is wrong. I don't think the sub is related to the plot, but there ...


3

The fourth point : will often use Japanese words like "Kawaii" to sound "cool" From A list of commonly used weeaboo words for normal people : Weeaboos are people who think they know Japanese, but they really only know a few words/phrases and know jack about syntax and grammar. kawaii = cute desu = lit. "it is" but weebs use it to make sentences ...


3

That's M. Night Shyamalan, a film director and screenwriter known for making films with supernatural plots and twist endings. Some examples of films he has created are The Sixth Sense, Signs, and The Last Airbender. There are a lot of memes about his signature plot twists. (Incidentally, I became first aware of M. Night Shyamalan memes from LittleKuriboh's ...


2

If you know what senpai means you may understand. Senpai means upperclassman or someone you look up to. This phrase is quite common in anime which have a school background. It is generally used when someone wants another student (who is older than them) to notice them or acknowledge their presence. I once found this online: It's a Japan thing. Senpai means ...


1

A much shorter answer: in a lot of manga and anime there is a character that likes a senpai, an upper classmen, however, no matter what they do, they can't get noticed by the senpai. So, the line expresses their desire to be noticed by their senpai. It has become a line to make fun of people when they are doing something for attention or interacting with ...


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