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According to the Wikipedia article, Tokuma Communications did a release in 1993, which was released on video by 20th Century Fox and dubbed again by Streamline as a special release for airlines. The Wikipedia article claims that Miyazaki would not allow any sort of editing, modification, or censorship, due to his disappointment with Warriors of the Wind, the ...


3

I may have the answer. It appears that this was never a scene that actually occurred in the movie at all in My Neighbour Totoro (The Movie). It was actually..... A promotional art for the movie My Neighbour Totoro I came to the conclusion when I watched the movie myself three times for clarification and asked some of my friends who helped me research a ...


3

I recently bought the Disney Blu-Ray release of My Neighbor Totoro from 2013, and the bath scene is in it. Here's screenshots: The Disney release is rated G, which means the MPAA considers it suitable to be watched by anyone. It has both subtitles and a dub starring a young Dakota and Elle Fanning as Satsuki and Mei, and Tim Daly, who is best known in ...


2

Based on quick research in Japanese, there's no official statement about the book used as a reference for Susuwatari (or Makkuro Kurosuke). The only traditional Japanese legend mentioned on Japanese Wikipedia is Kesaran Pasaran, which refers to the similarity to its form, but the similarity only goes as far as a fluffy furball (not even black). 外観は、...


2

If you check most of the animes that Hayao Miyazaki wrote/produced they all have environmentalism, pacifism, feminism, love and family themes to various degrees. For example in Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind is about the aftermath of a global war and find balance with Nature without repeating the mistakes for the past. Same thing with Laputa: Castle in ...


1

It is definitely a mushroom cloud except that it’s one that brings life instead of death. You see mushroom cloud-like imagery and symbols of radioactive destruction in a lot of post-WWII Japanese art and entertainment. There’s a whole book by Takashi Murakami called Little Boy which discusses this. My guess is that Totoro is about Japan re-finding it’s ...


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