15

According to the author1, he is based on Kawakami Gensai, a Japanese samurai of the late Edo period, who was executed by the Meiji Government. Not having seen the series nor being familiarized with the Gensai's story, I cannot tell you how much of it is based on samurai's story and how much of it is fiction. 1: *Watsuki, Nobuhiro (2003). "The Secret ...


14

I found this on the Wikipedia page for Rurouni Kenshin: Reflection Kenshin eventually becomes ravaged by an unknown disease that is much like leprosy (the writers have admitted there is no medical explanation for Kenshin's condition[citation needed]). To share his pain, Kaoru convinces Kenshin to infect her with the disease through sexual ...


12

~ござる is commonly known as a more polite way of ending a sentence, but it's also common in historical dramas because it is a bit archaic-sounding. ANN has an entry on this in their lexicon here. A more detailed analysis of Kenshin's speech patterns can be found here. EDIT: It was pointed out in chat that there's a closely related question with a really good ...


11

There are several reasons he would go the awful length to get his Sakabato forged by a master swordmaker, with metal: 1) Weight: there are no material at the time that could have the same density as metal. For a swordsman, the weight of the blade is very important. For Kenshin, since all of his attacks are blunt attacks, it is vital. 2) Resilience: enemies ...


10

Although it is never really stated they are "based on each other", Nobuhiro Watsuki helped in the making of One Piece. In the manga series "Rurouni Kenshin", the Straw Hats' flag design was used on a bomb to start a vengeance hit on one of the main characters of the series. Before writing "One Piece", Oda worked as an assistant to Nobuhiro Watsuki, the ...


9

Why does Himura always end almost every sentence with gozaru in this show? To express his self-abasement, modesty, and serving attitude. This is the persona he adopted in the Meiji era as a rurouni (wandering samurai). Kenshin's usage of this speech pattern is not for the intent of marking the series as historical fiction. This is evidenced by the fact ...


8

In this Wiki, it is stated that: Kenshin's eyes, too, are unusual, being a deep violet. In the anime series, when Kenshin's eyes change to reflect his psychological reversion to Hitokiri Battōsai, their color shifts from violet to gold.


8

Remember, Rurouni Kenshin is set during the late 19th Century. This is just after the American Civil War, during the British Victorian Era: the height of the British Empire, and a time when the Western powers were very interested in the riches of the Far East. The Western powers were mostly laissez-faire capitalists who would allow their people to trade ...


6

From Urban Dictionary: A Japanese expression of confusion. Often used by otaku to indicate confusion/disorientation. People who read/watch "Rurouni Kenshin" may pick up the habit of saying "Oro!" because Himura Kenshin says it often in the manga/anime. From Wikipedia page on Himura Kenshin: Nobuhiro Watsuki added Kenshin's trademark "oro" as a ...


6

Rurouni Kenshin: The Hokkaido Arc will continue in July issue of Jump Square, which will be published on June 4, 2018. [...] This June, it will resume serialization in Japan. [...] Starting June 4, however, Rurouni Kenshin's "Hokkaido Arc" will return to print. [...] Continuing, it added, "The author spends his days reflecting and with ...


5

A simple google search returns the following: Age 28 (about 33 end of series) Source: http://kenshin.wikia.com/wiki/Himura_Kenshin


5

Because Master Seijuro wasn't interested! He was, to put it bluntly, an introverted, misanthropic and somewhat lazy martial artist, who thought the world an unredeemable place, felt Kenshin a fool for wanting to improve society, and didn't care in the least to take down Shishio. (See particularly his interactions with Kenshin during episode 41, "The Ultimate ...


5

What you saw was an episode of Rurouni Kenshin Specifically, 63: "The Legend of the Fireflies" The episode is a perfect match to your description. In that episode, Kenshin, the protagonist, encountered an old man who told him the exact story that you laid out in your post. The man was already a hobbyist in swordsmanship, and participated in competitions ...


5

In the OAV series Rurouni Kenshin: Trust & Betrayal, we get to learn more about Kenshin and his trip from being a simple orphan to Japan's most feared assassin Hittokiri Battousai, and then to the peaceful Ruroni. As Hittokiri Battousai, he wasn't exactly evil. He had good intentions, and saw assassination as the only way he could help the weak and the ...


5

It's Rurouni Kenshin and the character you talking about is Shinomori Aoshi. Source - Wikipedia article for Shinomori Aoshi


5

Since your question is remarkably broad (historical facts, events, the art of the sword, the base for all of the characters & plot points), and since some aspects of Rurouni Kenshin's historicity have already been answered in other questions on this SE here, here, and here, and there are useful fan websites like this, this, this, and this, I will collect ...


5

I'm not sure if the Sceptics site would be a better fit for the "is this possible" portion of the question, but I'll give my attempt at an answer. As stated by my comment, TV Tropes calls this Clean Cut (which it argues is sometimes related to Absurdly Sharp Blade). Given that their naming for this is very "straightforward" (i.e. this trope describes making ...


3

This occurs pretty often, it is called Cultural streamlining To accommodate American viewers, anime dubbed in the United States is usually modified to suggest it occurs within the United States or a fictional country thus resembling it. This is commonly achieved by substituting Japanese elements in a series by elements drawn from American popular culture, ...


2

Tomoe knew that Kenshin was her fiance's assassin. She moved to Kyoto, desperate to find him. So we can assume that the rest of the family knew about Kenshin too. When Kenshin kills, he delivers the "Tenshu", a signature for the crimes, that identifies the faction responsible for the murders. Kenshin's reputation among the Ishin Shishi and their ennemies ...


2

I didn't find any good evidence at all for where this phrase comes from. A few weird Shinsengumi fan sites and Urban Dictionary claim that it was a real historical phrase, but Wikipedia and the question I posted to History SE claim it was not a real phrase and was invented by Nobuhiro Watsuki for the manga. Wikipedia claims without citation: The "Aku Soku ...


2

The final arc of the Rurouni Kenshin manga is indeed about a man, Enishi, who has an old grudge against Kenshin. However, the final arc of the manga was never put into the anime. There do exist two OVA series that adapt this part of the anime. The Trust and Betrayal OVAs adapts the backstory of the final arc, and the Reflection OVAs adapts the final arc, ...


2

You may be looking for Kokoro no Hadaka. It's typically referred to the Raijuta theme. It's by Ueda Yuji. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHl_sYLLktw Here's a list of all of RuroKen's OSTs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Rurouni_Kenshin_soundtracks This one is the fourth track in the Rurouni Kenshin Original Songs I soundtrack.


1

The song in your video is the third ending in the series named 'Heart of Sword'. You can find it here


1

Well as it was stated in the anime and manga, Shishio has the unique ability to neutralize any and all techniques he's seen before. So having witnessed Monk Anji multiple times over the course of his servitude use the many variations of the Futae No Kiwami, it would stand to reason he knew how to counter the technique.


1

No, there's no difference. From Wikipedia: In 1999 Sony tried and failed to market the series in the United States as Samurai X via an existing company. The TV series was later licensed in North America by Media Blasters, who split it up into "seasons", and released on DVD. The Wikipedia article links an Anime News Network article from the same time ...


1

No, there isn't. It called a localisation editing. Localisation is an essential process in releasing anime outside of Japan. It can cover a range of different processes depending on the individual title and the desired result. At its most basic level, the localisation process is responsible for deciding on romanised character and term names, as well as ...


1

But I'm pretty sure a bokuto would break if he was fighting against a person with a sharp blade. It's better to use a metal sword so it doesn't break. Yeah, metal's just stronger than wood.


1

You're gonna want to watch Trust & Betrayal, then Reflection. While the ending is not what the author wanted, its still semi-canon and good. It also covers some of the final arc (Jinchuu Arc) at the end of ova 1 and beginning of ova 2. Also the fight animations and soundtrack are great. Also worth watching if for nothing else than the reinvented ...


1

Okita Souji is an extremely well-known and well-liked historical figure in the minds of Japanese people, who generally know that he died of tuberculosis at about age 25. He died on July 19, 1868. The Meiji era started on September 8, 1868. In Rurouni Kenshin, Kenshin arrives in Tokyo in 1878. In the same way that a historical fiction about Abraham Lincoln ...


1

This question is tricky, since the author (I believe) masterfully incorporated real-life events/characters (Imperialists, Shinsengumi, etc.), while basing some of the fictional characters on real life people (Kenshin), and mixing in some pure fiction. Also the response would be too long for this thread. I would read the Kenshin Wikia which usually has trivia ...


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