41

In Japan, cicadas are symbolic of summer, and possibly symbolize reincarnation as well, based on summer being the time when the cicada comes out to sing.[1] As per their role in anime, according to Wikipedia, The songs of the cicada are often used in Japanese film and television to indicate the scene is taking place in the summer.   — ...


35

The Elfen Lied OP Code This original analysis is built on previous works by Anime Afterglow, 莉露兜 and 知日部屋. For the meaning of Kaede's hand gesture that was once popular in manga, see What's the significance of the 'w' finger position in Elfen Lied and In the opening of the Elfen Lied anime why does Nyu/Lucy have her fingers positioned in a certain way? All ...


17

The manga is far more informative than the movie. The movie seemed to adapt the first two and the last volumes for its content, without really bothering to explain anything about who characters were and where they came from. The manga, begins with a nuclear blast that destroy Tokyo and triggers World War III. I believe that there is a taboo on overtly ...


17

It isn't kanji. The character you see here, and others, were invented for this particular TV series. They're called ヨゴ文字 ("yogo moji"), and this character in particular is a substitute for the kana む ("mu"). See the following charts for details: kana and numbers As for what it means, given the context in your question, I would guess the む on his mask is ...


15

For one thing, the image of Totoro is part of Studio Ghibli's (one of the most famous and critically acclaimed animation studios) logo: The second thing is that the movie appeals highly to both children and adults. In a paper by Rieko Okuhara titled "Walking Along With Nature: A Psychological Interpretation of My Neighbor Totoro", she starts with: Why ...


14

I grew up in an area that was close to sea level (a bit further south than Japan) and in the Spring and Summer I recall hearing cicadas just about every time I went outside. I suspect the effect in anime is to improve immersion or accurately reflect the reality of the situation that the anime is trying to portray.


14

It's a pretty interesting explanation... In this wiki for Ninken (Ninja dogs): They all have a face-shaped design on their backs called Henohenomoheji (へのへのもへじ) — which is the sound made when all the characters in the face are put together. Appropriately enough, children use this design as the face for their scarecrows, which is "kakashi" in Japanese. ...


14

The reason why the author uses the different languages with different groups is because he feels that will attach uniqueness to that group. In one of his interviews I have read, he stresses that for him, characters are very important and he draws the characters first. In his interview in Germany, when he was asked the same question he replied as below "...


13

I don't think it is reference to anything specific since it's overly common whenever swords are (and sometimes when they aren't) involved in media. In general: it looks cool it's usually a show of triumph by combining display of: dominance (as other poses that make body "unwrap") combat impracticality (no one is doing this in the middle of it) ...


13

Those chairs are a direct reference to Bokurano, understanding which actually adds depth to the scene (if you've seen Bokurano). Bokurano huge spoilers:


12

According to a tweet from @anime_photokano (the official Photokano twitter account): 「フォトカノ」EDアニメーションのイントロで映る花ですが、順にリンドウ、ガーベラ、ヒマワリ、シロツメクサ、タンポポ、コスモス、スイートピーです(どの花がどのヒロインに対応しているかは以降のカットでご確認を)。本編でも、花のカットの使われ方にご注目ください! #photokano Loosely translated, Regarding the flowers at the beginning of the Photokano ED - in order, they are Japanese gentian, gerbera, ...


11

It is probably intentionally a swastika, though it is definitely not referring to Naziism. I don't know anything about Naruto canon, so I have no official source, but swastikas are often highly stylized and this certainly fits the bill. Googling for "Hindu swastika" or "Buddhist swastika" will yield plenty of images, some of which are pretty distorted (more ...


10

It's likely to be a homage to the work of El Greco, who used this hand symbol in his various works. Like this one titled The Gentleman with His Hand at His Breast or Christ Carrying the Cross The meaning of this gesture is subject to much debate... Some hypothesis indicate that: The hand gesture is a secret sign indicating that the gentleman is a ...


8

This song, being sung by the 3 main heroines, was especially made for the anime. The song uses the metaphor of an orange, likening the girls to an unripen, not yet matured, orange. This blog entry offers a much in-depth look into the meaning behind the song. Though the translations may differ between people, the general meaning stays intact. The blog ...


7

The progression of the phrase goes like this: ピーマン好き (Do you like [green] peppers)? ニンジン食べれる (Do you like to eat carrots)? 納豆にはネギ入れる方? (The method of sticking negi [spring onion] into natto [fermented soybeans] "Are you the type who puts spring onions in their natto?")? This phrase doesn't translate very well, but it's an equivalent to South Park "fish ...


7

looper's answer is correct but not quite complete. This answer will be based on the manga, mostly because I don't immediately have access to the anime, but also because I'm not sure how much of this is explained in the anime. Kanon's arc is flags (aka chapters) 7-10 in the manga. As the other answer points out, Kanon's idol career made her fear failure, ...


7

While the anime is never explicit about it's visual intentions, there are some potential implications for these two paintings: Most obviously, they both feature naked or semi-naked women, quite appropriate for an anime named "Lesbian Bear Storm"! More subtly, in both paintings the women are in a 'primal' state, whether in the wilds of the jungle, or leading ...


6

I believe this refers to the saying "like a moth to a flame". The saying indicates that something/someone is irresistibly attractive (not necessarily as in human attraction), but that it will ultimately lead to downfall. Remember, at the end, the flame engulfs the moth, and it dies. So, Bradley and Mustang are fighting for peace/freedom/a good future. They ...


6

Steins;Gate sort of uses the many-worlds time travel theory referenced by John Titor. There are many discrete worldlines, like parallel universes. When Okarin leaps to the past, he is moving from one worldline to another; his actions do not affect the future in the worldline he leaped from, only the future of the one he is currently in. The worldlines exist ...


6

The sign can be seen on all seen clan-members (okay; there's only Kimimaro and some guy in the anime), so I think that it's a clan-symbol.


5

I haven't seen it myself, but apples can often symbolize sexuality, temptation ("forbidden fruit") , fertility ("bearing fruit" as in your screenshot). Connections can also be made to the stories of Adam & Eve and Sleeping Beauty. The circular shape of an apple can also be a depiction of loops, or eternity - which is what it appears to be in ...


5

I would like to augment the earlier answer by explaining more Bokurano plot and dropping even more massive spoilers: Madoka is in many ways an homage to Bokurano, and besides being clever foreshadowing for the few who had watched the series, the chairs are there to acknowledge the fact and pay respect to this earlier series.


4

That's the currency symbol for the Yen, the Japanese currency. The Wikipedia article you have linked to in your question has this to say: Maris' obsession with money is demonstrated by her hair ornaments, in the shape of the symbol for Yen (Japanese money).


4

Fun Facts About Sebastian Michaelis' Symbol written by aneir on DeviantArt stated: Fact 2: Pentagram The Pentagram is a five-sided star, usually made with a single continuous line, with the points equally spaced. It is often depicted within a circle. This is one of several geometric star designs representing the mysteries of creation and redemption, ...


4

It has something to do with the term Mother Ocean, the fact that Japanese islands are made of several volcanoes linked together, their work ethics and custom. Mother Ocean Mother Ocean is a term used to refer to the fact that all lives on earth starts from the sea/ocean as described in Nagi no Asukara. Even after leaving the sea and becoming land creature, ...


3

I don't know if this story was the basis of the appearance of the moth but I know a story about it from our country Philippines. I don't know if this story is already known around the world but it was a story told by the mother of our national hero Jose Rizal. It was Jose Rizal's Mother who told him about the story of the moth. One night, her mother ...


3

To add on to Rarst's answer, the pyramid-shaped stance naturally channels the viewer's gaze to the sword, especially to its tip. This places focus on the "warrior spirit", typical of a declaration of victory. The "warrior spirit" is raised to a high position by the stance, which further befits the idea of "dominance".


3

Before Kanon became an idol, she was "socially invisible" - after the Citron broke up, she feared to be alone in front of a large group of people. The effect of being "transparent" expresses her shyness.


2

The movie is symbolic of Tokyo in a post world war environment, which is obvious from the first few minutes. Note, though, how it starts with a massive nuclear explosion, forcing Japan to start over and rebuild. Over the next thirty years, Tokyo becomes a hub of technological advancement, and a breeding ground for new businesses and capitalist opportunities. ...


2

I think the orange personifies the characters of the Toradora, mostly the girls (Taiga, Ami & Minori). The lyrics says, ORENJI iro ni hayaku naritai kajitsu kimi no hikari wo abite which translates to: The fruit wants to hurry up And turn orange-colored Basking in your light means that the girls want to be more matured, like a still unripe ...


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