58

This article here explains very well why Anime OPs are so long in the first place. To summarize a few of the points: Cost Spread out commercial breaks Advertisement for record companies. Cost: Each episode is a total 25 min. which leaves 5 min. for commercials in a 30 min. time-slot. Furthermore, OPs and EDs are typically reused for most of the episodes ...


35

The Elfen Lied OP Code This original analysis is built on previous works by Anime Afterglow, 莉露兜 and 知日部屋. For the meaning of Kaede's hand gesture that was once popular in manga, see What's the significance of the 'w' finger position in Elfen Lied and In the opening of the Elfen Lied anime why does Nyu/Lucy have her fingers positioned in a certain way? All ...


17

The answer is yes. According to the pamphlet included in the Elfen Lied OST, the melody of Lilium just surfaced to MOKA, the two-person musician group who was appointed the music producer staff of the Elfen Lied anime TV production team, when they looked at Elfen Lied from a certain perspective: it's not that Lucy wants to be born special — what she desires,...


17

Several reasons: Production cost, first impression, spoilers. Theme songs are commonly used to save money on production. Draw that opening once and show 90 seconds of a roughly 22-minute episode every time. And there is also an ending which is a double value :p When a series is only starting, you might want to make it interesting right away, and not just ...


14

I think this is only common among shows aimed at children. All of the examples you gave were shows which are, at least partly, aimed at children. Having karaoke for the song helps the younger viewers sing along, and also has some educational benefits in terms of learning more advanced characters. If you watch anime targeted at older viewers, they rarely have ...


11

tl;dr Shōnan Bakusōzoku, an OAV from 1986 with 12 episodes and 12 endings (ended only in 1999). Intro I took up Gao WeiWei's suggestion and used ANN's API to create a duplicate of their database and then search for all titles that have as many OPs/EDs as they have episodes. If anyone is interested in the code for this (it's not nice :P) and all results, go ...


10

For the first question, the answer is yes. This is especially true with female seiyuu. As you noted, Nana Mizuki is also a singer other than a seiyuu. You can check her discography here. She even went to a duet with T.M. Revolution. Other female seiyuu's that is worth noted: Itou Kanae (Meat - Haganai) Albums including Kokoro Keshiki and Miageta Keshiki ...


10

The following answer is based on the results I got on Google [from my country (France)]. Keeping the following elements in mind, one can say that their popularity level is more or less the same. The comparison is made between the first Japanse theme めざせポケモンマスター (Aim to be a Pokemon Master) and the first English theme "Gotta catch them all." I take into ...


9

I hummed the song in Soundhound and it recognized it thanks a lot guys! It's Aqua Times - ALONES It's the 6th Bleach opening theme song.


8

Tvtropes call that a Last Episode Theme Reprise, and mentions that it is used in video games as well: Since it's standard practice to make a Theme Song as awesome as possible, said theme likes to find its way into a privileged position in the final battle. At The Climax of the series, when things are at their most epic, the theme gets played over ...


8

It looks like the entire OP has been translated in this article. It says that the lines are from 2 different EF related songs, "Eternal Feather" from the ending theme of the last episode of "ef - a tale of memories" and "Emotional Flutter" from the opening of the game "ef - a latter tale". The article has all of the text, side-by-side, with the English ...


8

This song, being sung by the 3 main heroines, was especially made for the anime. The song uses the metaphor of an orange, likening the girls to an unripen, not yet matured, orange. This blog entry offers a much in-depth look into the meaning behind the song. Though the translations may differ between people, the general meaning stays intact. The blog ...


8

The simplest way to answer this question is to take a look at a sample of anime and see how many of them have OPs/EDs sung by the show's voice actors. For the sake of argument, I will look at all shows with at least 10 episodes that began airing in winter 2014, excluding children's shows. I will only examine those OPs and EDs that were aired at some point ...


8

The characters look very similar to Jindai moji (Encyclopedia of Shinto link) (Japanese Wikipedia link). (Image taken from Talk:Jindai moji page on Wikipedia) These characters are theorized to have been Japan's character system before Chinese characters were introduced. If I go through that table for the first image you show and match the characters (...


7

As is almost always the case with anime music, Lilium was composed just for Elfen Lied. KONISHI Kayo and KONDO Yukio collectively handled the composition, arrangement, and lyricwriting (and also did the rest of the soundtrack).


6

Yes, it is common for most of anime to user their seiyu to sing the opening and/or ending theme. Why? According to this link which explains why Anime Theme Songs are created: Another reason this is done is because many anime voice actors are also singers, often the more successful ones. It's not unknown for production companies to organize some of ...


6

This blogpost has a transcript of all of the text from the opening. Not all of them are famous quotes. "I saw you in Heaven and heard of your glory You saved our world from the fallen angels I saw Messiah standing Standing before me with no words Nothing but "Hope" When we lost dread, a Demon was laughing But now you are showing us wonder ...


6

In most cases, yes. A popular example of this is the anime K-On!. All the openings, endings and insert songs are written for the anime itself. They use the anime to advertise it and to sell more. Here is the list of the anime's albums which if you observe, are really dedicated for the anime itself. It even had two live concerts, Let's Go! and Come With Me ...


6

The song that plays at the end of episode 12 is the same as the opening theme song. It is called "Unravel", and is by TK. Lyrics and more information can be found on the Tokyo Ghoul Wiki. The full version of the song can be heard on YouTube.


6

You are right. The anime is indeed Miraculous Ladybug. Now, there's a little issue with the title and the lyrics of the song. According to the Ladybug PV wiki site, The song that plays with it is a test song titled Ladybug PV Song without true lyrics, having English-like gibberish, lyrics can be found here. Then they also state what Gao already said in ...


5

I don't think any official explanations were given (I tried to search but there are only speculations). I think the most probable reason is the fact that when you're watching broadcasts on TV, as soon as the ending theme song pops up you change to another channel. Almost nobody watches the ending credits/openings and this is true also for other things. ...


5

The Opening and Ending tracks are normally shorter for anime, as the songs were usually originals developed before the anime and the artist was paid for a portion of it to be used in the anime, not to mention that the songs also need to fit in broadcast time. On the other hand, there are also Opening and Ending tracks which were purposely made for the anime (...


5

There's also an OP sung in Mandarin, but it looks like my old link to that has been removed from Youtube by Bandai. There's this Spanish Full Opening that I believe is sung by Jessica Toledo. And this appears to be (the song at least) a Korean version of the short OP.


5

This is not uncommon - a number of shows will have a first episode with no song at the beginning, and with the OP at the end of the episode. I'll pull in some examples of this later. There are also somewhat more unusual cases like Madoka (as Memor-X points out in the comments), in which "Connect" (usually the opening) was used as the ending song in episode ...


5

According to Wikipedia Porno Graffitti (ポルノグラフィティ Poruno Gurafiti), also known as Porno (ポルノ Poruno) is a Japanese male rock band from Innoshima, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Current and Past Members only lists 3 names and Wikipedia only has a link to the past member Masami Shiratama which says: After leaving the band in June 2004, he released the ...


5

The anime Kotoura-san is like this as well. It starts off showing you a type of introduction. From my point of view I feel that animes do this in order to tell a story more thoroughly without the spoilers that most openings usually show. That way you aren't introduced to certain characters too early and you gain a better understanding of what the anime is ...


4

It turns out that the song Mata Ashita from Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica are in episode 1 and 2 on the Bluray version which I don't have. I only have the regular version, so I haven't heard that song in the anime. After doing some research, I discovered that the other songs are also like that. They are used in the extra episode, or Bluray version, etc.


4

tl;dr they're probably not singing any humanly-intelligible words at all. You have run into the fascinating phenomenon known as Kajiuran (梶浦語 kajiura-go), a pseudo-language/non-language, named for Yuki KAJIURA, who is the composer for FictionJunction (among other things). One very common quirk of Kajiura's compositions is that they feature lyrics written in ...


3

This tune is from Bleach, Opening 6 here.


3

This ending theme song is titled La Divina Tragedia: Ma Kyoku. It was recorded by Jimang. The song does not appear in any other anime. From the looks of it, Jimang has not had any other song appear in any anime. But one of his other tracks, Sakura POP, has been used in the Korean MMORPG, MapleStory.


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