Hot answers tagged

74

While backbenchers are common throughout the world, windows seats are similarly favoured by just about everybody in most situations. People want and prefer window seats be they in classrooms, trains, or aeroplanes. In anime, these seats additionally facilitate a few things (some of which have been covered in other answers): The character can look out of the ...


52

Anime characters having large eyes is generally attributed to Osamu Tezuka{1}, an artist prolific enough to be called the "father of manga", and the creator of Astro Boy, the source of the image you shared in your question (among other manga). At the time of Astro Boy (1952), Tezuka was inspired by precursors in animation, largely those of Walt Disney, but ...


42

In Japan, cicadas are symbolic of summer, and possibly symbolize reincarnation as well, based on summer being the time when the cicada comes out to sing.[1] As per their role in anime, according to Wikipedia, The songs of the cicada are often used in Japanese film and television to indicate the scene is taking place in the summer.   — Cicada, Wikipedia I ...


39

This answer was based on a valid criticism of the question in the answer by coleopterist. It does not seek to answer any of the questions posed in the OP, which in my opinion are already satisfactorily answered in several of the other answers, and should ideally be viewed as an extended comment on that answer. The following are preliminary statistics, based ...


28

I have never noticed that before, but it sounds quite logical to me considering these points. The character can look to the outside world giving more freedom to new plot lines. Less background students make it easier to draw focus on the important characters, especially during class hours, when the seats must be taken. Maybe just personal preference, but I ...


28

This is the Eyelid Pull Taunt This is the act of pulling down one lower eyelid and sticking out the tongue and saying "Beh-da!" (Japanese) or "Nyaaaah!" (English dub). A highly ritualized expression of disdain or disapproval, used exclusively by children and immature adults. Basically the same as the Western act of sticking out the ...


25

This triangle-shaped headband is called a tenkan (天冠, lit. "heaven crown"). In some parts of Japan, it may also be called a zukin (頭巾, lit. "hood" and also used as a generic term), a hitai-eboshi (額烏帽子, lit. "forehead headpiece"), or a kami-kakushi (髪隠し, lit. "hair-hider")2. Traditionally, the tenkan was one component of a traditional burial garment (shini-...


23

The other answer is technically correct, but I don't think the term "idiot hair" is actually common in the English-speaking anime community apart from on TVTropes. The Japanese term for this is ahoge, which literally translates to "idiot hair", but that translated term isn't particularly frequently used. A search 'Ahoge anime' gets around 700k Google hits ...


23

My feeling is that Hakase's answer is half-correct. I agree that characters are generally chosen so that the target audience can relate to them. However, I disagree that means that they're necessarily the same age as the target audience. That is to say, people don't necessarily relate best (as a group) to people who are of the same age as them. What people ...


22

This trope is usually attributed to Fist of The North Star, after Kenshiro attacks someone he pauses and says "You are already dead". It is only then that they realise their defeat and the attacks are applied. Reference. Another Reference (TVTropes) It's similar to how in Road Runner, Wilee Coyotee often runs off of cliffs, without realising the ground ...


22

Because some people like women with big breasts. As usual, anime exaggerates; it can't just have a woman with big breasts, it has to have a woman with ridiculously gigantic breasts. This isn't purely a Japanese thing. Actually, I would argue that it came in origin from American media that were exported to Japan. In the US, large breasts are often considered ...


21

The most likely culprit is Go Nagai, the father of Ecchi fan service. You can probably trace it down to as early as "Shameless School", which often had female characters "losing" their clothes: But the actual tearing off of clothes may have first been in Mazinger Z's manga (circa 1972), linked from the very article in the question: It happens to ...


21

This “fluffy ball” is a standard part of any sword care kit (see the red ball in the picture below). It contains some sort of powder ‒ I believe chalk ‒ that is used gather and bind any fluids on the sword before oiling it again. (That powder acts sort of like a sponge.) When cleaning your sword you will usually use clean water to remove any big pieces of ...


20

Note: Some references have been excluded here for PG reasons. There's a few layers to this question. Firstly, this isn't a hentai-specific thing. Lots of Japanese non-animated porn contains rape. This is a cultural thing spanning more than just anime. The main reason as some people have pointed out to you is that it sells. But let's go a little further ...


18

Who was the first character to have a snaggletooth? I don't have any source for when historically in anime/manga this was used. But the earliest that I can think of is Lum from the Urusei Yatsura manga and that was published in the late 70's. From Chapter 1: and also seen, for various circumstances, throughout the run of the manga and anime. So it's ...


17

Another reason could also be that the proximity of the window allows different light settings on the character. A brighter light make the character 'shine' compared to the others that are in the darker part of the room.


17

From my English composition class - its easier to write a story around a theme. I don't think stories that use the seven deadly sins are more prevalant in Anime, its just that we are talking about eastern entertainment using western themes, which naturally calls more attention to itself. As far as there being any significant message in the theme of the seven ...


17

Is is just for fan service (showing boobs and bikinis)? Mostly yes. Occasionally there are plot points or setting circumstances that require a scene be on a beach (legitimate reasons that is, like a romantic beach walk with an imprtant conversation, rather than poor excuses for bikini parades) For example, the Pretty Cure franchise has one Beach Episode ...


17

Most of this is a summary of the paper Maid in Japan: An Ethnographic Account of Alternative Intimacy by Patrick W. Galbraith (author of 'the otaku encyclopaedia') The first maid costume in Japanese popular culture came from the erotic anime series Cream Lemon, part 11: Black Cat Mansion in 1986. (Hiroki Azuma, Otaku: Japan's Database Animals, ...


16

First, this question begs the question of “Are the Seven Deadly Sins often used in anime?” Full Metal Alchemist and Soul Eater are provided as examples. Both series deal with the concepts of souls, taboos, and consequences of breaking said taboos. It makes sense that in such a storyline, like stories featuring shinigami, you might come across inclusion of ...


16

I cannot tell you who started it or where it comes from exactly, but it is based on the fact that mushrooms grow in dark and dank places. Exactly the kind of environment depressed characters are visually and mentally put into. It is mentioned in the Corner of Woe trope: Bonus points if you manage to act gloomy enough to attract Ghost Lights or grow ...


16

Actually it's not only Kyoto. Depending on the manga's theme, the field trip could be anywhere, but yes, most of the time it'd be Okinawa, Hokkaido, Kyoto and Osaka. As a side note, most of the manga I read has the school trip to Okinawa and Hokkaido instead of Kyoto like yours. Okinawa is usually visited during winter because due to its geographical ...


16

There's probably no one answer for why they drink milk in general, but as far as the bathing, it's considered a traditional drink in Japanese public bath houses after a soak: There is usually a refreshment cooler here where customers can self-serve and pay the attendant. Milk drinks are traditional favorites and sometimes there is ice cream. Most places ...


16

According to The Otaku Encyclopedia: An Insider's Guide to the Subculture of Cool Japan, Lum Invader from Urusei Yatsura is possibly the first tsundere to exist (and also potentially the source of all moe) Urusei Yatsura started manga distribution in 1978 and Lum's cold exterior (but in actuality being kind and loving) accrued her the title. However, ...


16

TL;DR: No, real-life student councils do not have absolute powers and aren't as powerful as depicted in anime or manga. Long answer Japanese school life tends to be much more hierarchical and organized, with students being put in charge of far more of how things operate and thus the concept of student council comes. So first, let's define student council in ...


15

I noticed this as well and it is not even just about where the student sits. In most cases that I've seen, the camera angle is facing the windows (lunch periods, random talking around a desk, etc.) My theory is that the windows allow for multiple benefits. First, many shows are not just about the school, so looking out the window can be a bit of a waiting-...


15

Animated male nipples are not a matter of legal Japanese censorship (or copyright law). It is fine to air them on TV in prime time. As Ray noted in a deleted answer, Dragonball, viewed as a most-typical shounen anime aimed at children, features male characters whose nipples are easily visible. Although the series garnered many adult and female fans, the ...


15

As the member of the Manga & Illustration Society student club at a Japanese national university, I have seen young Japanese women involved in sub-culture perform this joking action in public in real life. I have seen it done in a small group of female friends while staying at an onsen ryokan (traditional inn at a hot spring), in the midst of a large ...


15

In-universe, no reason is given apart from the fact that every time I can recall this happening they were near trees and thus a chunk of wood was convenient. The actual source is never addressed, and we never see trees falling over because they lost a chunk of themselves. For the real-world reason...It's a Japanese trope based on the actual legends built up ...


15

In the media/anime-verse, they do not have any specific name for themselves. The eyes themselves form a part of the Wingding Eyes: For animated characters, the eyes are the windows to the soul—literally. So literally, that their eyes become their innermost thoughts projected in very clear symbols for all to see. For example, the common ones mentioned ...


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