10

I doubt Yasaburou was insinuating that he was from the traditional Czech lands. Instead he meant Bohemianism, which is used to describe people of unconventional lifestyles. Also see: Urban dictionary, Merriam Webster, Dictionary.com. a person (as a writer or an artist) living an unconventional life usually in a colony with others pertaining to or ...


8

Going counter clockwise from the top left: Kinkaku (upper, older brother) Ginkaku (lower, younger brother) Suzuki Satomi (Benten, as a schoolgirl she wears the blue blazer and has her hair up) Yaichiro (tiger ver.) The Mom (of the four Shimogamo brothers, house mother ver.) Yasaburo (cross-dress ver.) Kouji Kumeta, best known for the Sayonara, Zetsubou-...


8

To me, it looks like Baumkuchen, a german cake.


8

In Japanese folklore, creating sparks by striking flint is considered to be lucky for someone leaving a house or group. The brief fire was once a way to drive evil spirits away. I found a reference to it being called kiribi, but there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of information on it. Considering where Yaichiro is going as he leaves, it would be logical ...


8

The pose itself seems to be a reference to a similar billboard ad from the American Sci-fi movie Blade Runner. In this ad, a woman dressed as a Geisha is holding a pill in a similar way to the image above. The dress is similar for both characters, as is the object being held. You can watch the ad here. The ad plays several times throughout the movie. The ...


5

Makiko Itoh answered the question "Do people in Japan actually eat tanuki in hot pot?". A side information of her shows "I write about Japanese food and cooking and am Japanese". I quote her answer below: A long, long time ago it may have been more widely eaten, but these days it rarely is. Even when it is eaten it's limited to certain ...


3

The answer was finally revealed in the follow-up "The Eccentric Family 2." The earlier series had established that some tanuki have stimuli that undo their transformations -- Yasaburo's mother, for example, loses her ability to hold on to her transformation when she sees or hears lightning, and she reverts to tanuki form. The reason Kaisei hides herself ...


2

Here's a really good collection of references about Tanuki folklore: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/tanuki.shtml Some of the things that it mentions: Tanuki assumed human form, haunted and possessed people, and were considered omens of misfortune. Many centuries later in Japan, they evolved into irrepressible tricksters, aiming their illusory ...


2

Common given names in Japan have a certain format since probably the Showa period. Old fashioned male names go something like "something-number-郎". Kinkaku and Kinkaku's actual names are 呉二郎 and 呉三郎 (Kunijirou and Kunisaburo). Female names usually go something like "something-子" or "something-美". Kaisei breaks from this traditional name sense, which is ...


2

It's likely to be yuzu, a sour, tart, graperuit-like citrus fruit that have a very distinctive fragrance. In Japanese cuisine, their juices are often used as seasoning, and their rind as a garnish. It's tradition to a take a hot bath with yuzu during the winter solstice, for the fragrance and various health benefits.


2

The actual rooftop garden does not seem to exist, but there is a likely model for this building, which is located northwest of this temple. It seems to be a private building this is a school that teaches Ikebana/華道. It's likely this rooftop area is not open to the public. This seems to be the closest match to the building depicted in the anime.


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