21

According to my research, many sources point to the normal anime approach. It's not really different than a normal anime with occasional ero scenes. A blog from Pink Pineapple (Japanese, possibly NSFW!) mentioned how the voice recording session for its adult anime, Boy Meets Harem THE ANIMATION (MyAnimeList, possibly NSFW!), was done: [...] Even though ...


13

The most prominent example that comes to mind is Pokémon, which has used Ikue Ohtani's voice for Pikachu for almost the entire series.


13

Your question is somehow related to this question. Sometimes, an animated character is better suited for being voiced by a voice actor of the opposite sex. Maybe a higher voice is needed for a male, or a lower voice for a female. A common variant for this is for young boys, usually 12 and under, to be voiced by an adult woman. This is because ...


11

The first seiyuus that were credited in an anime were Furukawa Roppa and Sawa Ranko. They voiced characters in Chikara to Onna no Yo no Naka (The World of Power and Women). Unfortunatly, this anime was lost in time and there are no copies still available. The Seiyuus - who were highly reputed names at the time (Furukawa as a famous comedian, Sawa as a ...


10

There are multiple cases. 1) Child seiyuu (voice actors) are pretty much unheard of in Japan. (It is not impossible [for example, Matsuura Aya voiced Kaga Rin in Usagi Drop, which aired when she was about 10 years old], but most seiyuu are at least 14 years old when they begin working [such as Maaya Sakamoto when she debuted as Kanzaki Hitomi in Tenkuu no ...


10

For the first question, the answer is yes. This is especially true with female seiyuu. As you noted, Nana Mizuki is also a singer other than a seiyuu. You can check her discography here. She even went to a duet with T.M. Revolution. Other female seiyuu's that is worth noted: Itou Kanae (Meat - Haganai) Albums including Kokoro Keshiki and Miageta Keshiki ...


9

A similar thing happened with Tomoko Kawakami, who voiced Soi Fong while Bleach was still airing. While she went on hiatus due to ovarian cancer, she was replaced by Houko Kuwashima. Once the news of her death broke, Kuwashima assumed the role until the end of the series. It's a sad day when a seiyuu passes, but the general trend has often been to keep ...


9

Well, somebody has to do the grunting. It may sound like I'm joking, but I'm really not. I don't know if canned grunts or grunt SFX packages exist, but I don't think the producers would want to use them - Seki has to grunt in a number of different ways and in a number of different contexts, and when you get down to it, Seki's grunts can really be quite ...


9

This is common for pre-pubescent male characters who haven't had their voice drop yet. To have people voice male characters like that, the two choices, in general, are having a woman voice them or having a pre-pubescent boy voice them. It's a lot easier to find good good women to voice the boys than to find good young boys. From Wikipedia: Voice actors ...


9

There are two aspects we can discuss on this topic. Some directors like Miyazaki prefer to hire film actors. He said anime seiyuu is too optimized for anime and does not sound natural. Seiyuu is good when the target audience is anime fans, but if they want to get a broader audience, actors are the best choice. Another aspect is getting attention by using ...


8

Well I don´t think they actually classify the quality of each voice. Why do I think so? Most seiyuu are picked after they either send in some records or do a vocal audition, or they have done voice overs/acting before and are scouted this way. When a company wants some voice acting done, they usually keep in mind the characters that have to be voiced. ...


8

From time to time non-native Japanese speakers are employed as voice actors in Japan, but it's very unusual. A more ambitious anime production might use native speakers of other languages to voice minor roles whose only lines are not in Japanese. It's even rarer for a recurring or major character whose lines are mostly in Japanese to be voiced by someone ...


6

What I'm asking here is what most seiyuu do after they are no longer famous Firstly, the assumption that other professions with an early retire age generally have a following job that most workers transition to is not entirely accurate. For your NFL example, according to this, only 19% of coaches were former players and when you consider the much faster ...


6

Her Japanese Wiki page tells us the origin of that nickname: 愛称 愛称の一つである「へごちん」は、2013年にweb番組『五十嵐裕美のチャンネルはオープンソースでっ!』にゲスト出演した際、「頭へ ゴチン」を「頭を ヘゴチン」と読み間違えたことが由来。さらに省略されて「へご」とも呼ばれるようになった。 My translation and my explanation in the parentheses: Nickname One of her nicknames "Hego-chin" came from an incident that took place in 2013 when Ohashi made a ...


5

Well, here's an album of all the cast credits from the first 9 episodes of Non Non Biyori: link. None of them list Suguru. At minimum, then, we know that he hasn't had any lines so far. Maybe we'll have a big reveal in the final episode or something that Suguru actually does speak, but for the time being, I think it's safe to say that he doesn't have a ...


5

I looked up each of the listed "major" and "popular" male and female seiyuu at Hitoshi Doi's Seiyuu (voice actor) Database (Doi's database has been collecting seiyuu information since 1994 and hit 50,000 entries in 2001). Although this is not a representative sampling of all seiyuu, out of these 20 individuals recognized as "major" and "popular" by Doi, 4 (...


5

Looking Vic Mignogna up gives me his website. His contact page lists his email and also has a mail-to link, although the linked email and the email listed are different from each other. Mignogna is also on Twitter, so I suppose you could also tweet at him. I've no idea whether he usually responds to general emails; I don't watch English dubs much and also ...


5

The answer for Kiniro Mosaic is that ... the anime was never dubbed in English so they never had to worry about it. More generally, it will depend a lot on the way the dubbing company chooses to localise it, which in turn often depends on the expected audience for the dub. In the case of Azumanga Daioh, for example, the English jokes were made into Spanish ...


4

According to Nami's Wikipedia's page: In the Japanese version of the entire One Piece anime series, and later spin-offs, Nami has been voiced by Akemi Okamura. In 2001, Okamura temporarily left the series due to her pregnancy; Wakana Yamazaki acted as a substitute for episodes 70-78.


4

IMDb is mistaken in that Alison Viktorin is "known for" Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. As was stated in the comments. IMDb simply sees that Viktorin did voice work for Brotherhood, sees that Brotherhood is a very famous title, and assumes that she is well-known for her work in it. This is quite contrary to the truth, though. Viktorin is credited only as "...


4

Norio Wakamoto is not the only (though he is one of the most famous) seiyuu who has been pigeonholed on a certain type of anime character personality (though he is also capable of portraying other roles), to be specific, a villain character, but actually, there are a lot. You can see those people in this list. About your question (which kind of confuse me ...


4

The answer depends on your definition of "common". Most anime don't include dialects or accents, so in that sense it's not "common" however it's not unusual for a show to do so. There are quite a number of shows that include characters with dialects, most often Kansai/Osaka-ben, but when they do it's almost always for a direct purpose. Some examples: ...


4

While the Japanese language does have various words that are second person pronouns, the most natural way that doesn't have any hidden meaning behind it of referring to the other person is using their name, together with a honorific. Using a second person pronoun in such situations may come off either as too rude or too intimate (e.g. "anata" is used by a ...


3

Shouya's mother, Miyako's CV is credited as ゆきのさつき/雪野五月 (Yukino Satsuki).


3

As a matter of fact, Mari Iijima reprised her role as Lynn Minmei in ADV's 2006 English dub of the 1982 anime Super Dimension Fortress Macross. Unfortunately I can't find any clips of the dub, but here's an English interview with her about the role.


3

Nope. But it's way easier for a woman to imitate the voice of a child boy than for a man, and many anime characters are supposed to be pre-voice change.


3

In the case of Lucky Star, this is because the drama CD predates the anime by about two years, and was produced by a completely different group of people. When Kyoto Animation took on the Lucky Star anime project, they decided to cast new voice actors. Why? I don't know in this specific case, but one possibly contributing factor is that drama CDs are likely ...


3

From what I have read, eroge voice-work is not a desirable path. The pay is less, although I'm not sure how much exactly. I think voice actors are generally paid by the word, and long/complicated lines are not usually required in eroge. I don't know how they would measure a payment for just breathing and other sounds. Most voice actors are similar to ...


3

No, Seiyuus do not get pay more for voicing h scene in anime. In anime, all seiyuus have a fixed salary per episode. As long as he/she appeared in an episode, he/she is going to get paid the same amount regardless of how many words he said. The salary is dependent on the experience of the seiyuu. This is a mechanism to prevent unhealthy competition between ...


3

Hanazawa Kana's Hanazawa Kana Hitori de Dekiru kana: You can listen to this radio program on Thursday, 23:00-23:30 Japan time, by visiting the following URL: https://www.uniqueradio.jp/form/form5.php. This channel is legal under Japanese law. I don't know if it's accessible from outside Japan. You will be asked in Japanese where you live, your occupation, ...


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