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We have always seen Naruto using this technique - Taju Kage Bushin no Jutsu. I agree that Naruto's stamina is 5/5, but.. he uses the technique for an unbelievable number of times.

For example, let's say he has a chakra level of 100%, and he creates 3 clones, which means each clone will have 25% chakra of the original.

  1. If 3 clones get destroyed by an opponent, or
  2. Naruto undoes the jutsu

In both cases, Naruto learns the information the clones have gathered. Do they also return their chakra back to Naruto?

Ideally, they should return in case 2! However, I am not sure about case 1.

If they don't, then Naruto's chakra level should go down exponentially, as long as he creates new clones.

Now since Naruto has mastered Senjutsu (which of course has a time limit), he can create 2 clones in the battlefield itself with the help of natural energy. Also with Nine Tails chakra, he can create unlimited number of clones, because Tailed Beasts possess unlimited (compared to human limits) amount of chakra. But how about his battles prior to his Senjutsu or Nine-Tails form?

  • 2
    The nine-tailed beast does not have unlimited chakra. – looper Jan 25 '13 at 7:42
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    As I have mentioned compared to human limits. – InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 25 '13 at 8:57
  • I'm sorry, I missed it. – looper Jan 25 '13 at 9:20
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Naruto uses that technique to gain the Sen-chakra in the fight against Pain, so yes, the chakra is transferred to the user, when the clone is destroyed.

  • +1 Thanks. That brings some idea.. well the question now I have is destroyed or jutsu undone ? Two times he undoes jutsu to gain sen-ckakra. Once by summoning and undoing.. And once due to seal manipulation by 4th hokage! So both times clone weren't destroyed but jutsu was undone! – InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 25 '13 at 9:00
  • Or is it undo and destroy both result same? Destroy meaning, Naruto's clone tries to fight and gets beaten or stabbed likely to get killed. Since its a clone it just gets vanished. – InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 25 '13 at 9:02
  • @Sai: From my understanding, it's the same. – looper Jan 25 '13 at 9:07
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This part of the wiki provides some additional details on this particular usage of the technique:

characteristic that is unique to the Shadow Clone Technique is that any experience the clones gain during their existence is transferred to the user once they are dispersed. This makes the technique ideal for spying, since the user can simply send a clone to spy on a target, then have the clone disperse itself without returning to pass the information back to the user.

It's also useful for training purposes, since the total amount of experience the user gains is multiplied by the total number of clones being used to train. For example, if a user creates one shadow clone and trains together with this clone for one hour, then dispels the clone, the user gains two hours of training in one hour by adding the hours of clone and the user together.

and

[...] Naruto also uses shadow clones in order to counter the limit of Sage Mode, the need to stay still on a battlefield to gather more senjutsu chakra, as well as the inability of the Two Great Sage Toads to merge with him due to the presence of the Nine-Tailed Demon Fox inside him. By infusing his shadow clones with senjutsu chakra and leaving them at Mount Myōboku, Naruto can recall them to him on the battlefield and dispel the technique causing the chakra they have stored up to return to the original body.

  • Question is about retaining of chakra. The technique distributes chakra to clones equally. So if clone returns chakra to the host .. then it would be ideal. – InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 25 '13 at 9:20
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    According to the cited parts, information, experience and chakra (even 'type of chakra' that was being possessed by the clone) is returned when the clone is dispersed (peacefully or forcefully) – Veger Jan 25 '13 at 9:21
  • thank you very much Veger, even looper provided the same example of Naruto's fight with pain. Thank you. +1 – InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 25 '13 at 9:22

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